42

"Perhaps even more telling, more movies in 2013 featured more black actors in important roles that drove more patrons to
Much in the way DJ Earworm produces his yearly "United State of Pop" mashup, one industrious YouTube user has brought us
Check out more of Chiwetel Ejiofor's HuffPost Live segment in the clip above. As we steadily approach the closing months
As a man always on guard when it comes to the Yankees, I found myself actually wishing Mariano Rivera wasn't leaving baseball. Weird. For his whole career, I'd been wishing him to falter or leave the game, and here I was -- wanting him to stick around and loving the guy.
It's all becoming clear now. House Republicans are just really big fans of Douglas Adams -- that's been their plan all along.
Recently I watched The Jackie Robinson Story (1950) (staring Jackie Robinson as himself) and 42 (2013) back to back. They tell the story of how Robinson broke the color barrier in professional baseball and changed race relations in America.
As the mother of a mixed-race 8-year old, I often think about how to keep my son's eyes, ears, and heart, open to the realities and ignorance of racism. He and a friend recently saw the movie 42, and for the first time, heard the 'n-word' thrown around like a baseball.
I first met Jackie as a 13-year-old insecure kid at Grossinger's, the famous resort hotel in New York's Catskill Mountains owned by members of my family.
I still have the photograph of my brother and me shaking hands with Pee Wee Reese and Jackie Robinson. As I look at it, my mind goes back to a balmy evening in April of 1954. I was 15 years old and my father proudly brought his two sons to the first baseball game of our lives.
42 is a movie about how personal courage can change the world. Courage comes in many forms. Last week we were reminded of the incredible courage of common citizens and first responders in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon attacks.