80s music

And judging by the warm reception from Tiffany's fans? The feeling is more than mutual. If the stars of today want a long
Boys, you will thank me later for your vast knowledge of good... dare I say great... music.
Having grown up in the Eighties I am fortunate to consider myself part of the MTV Generation. From the second that rocket ship was set into space, that astronaut planted that flag on the moon, that guitar riff played in the background, I was hooked.
Imagine telling my teenage self that if I was very patient, when I'm in my late 30s, I would meet the idols of my youth. Duran Duran: Twenty-four years later, 85 million-plus records later. Me: Three sons later, a long career in journalism later. It finally happened.
We always have '80s music on in the house, and Sam always sits at the kitchen table with his crayons, markers, paints and paper. Soon, he started to draw more songs
"The person I was 30 years ago -- and, to an extent, who I still am -- I was someone who loved and craved attention," shares Jimmy Somerville, "But when I got it, I couldn't cope with it."
Imagine a time where you couldn't check Facebook every 19 seconds or Instagram your lobster mac and cheese before you even took a bite. Dark times.
Though it's taken three decades, Jimmy Somerville is finally ready to realize his musical dreams. As he celebrates the 30th anniversary of massive breakthrough "Smalltown Boy," the singer prepares to unveil an upcoming disco album.
Music brings the memories back like nothing else can. With certain songs, you are able to relive a moment. At least I am.
Last year, news broke that three duets featuring Michael Jackson and Freddie Mercury would soon be released. According to
Comfortably at No. 5 though, besting acts like The Spice Girls, En Vogue and Martha & The Vandellas, was Exposé. According to singer Jeanette Jurado, the '80s freestyle collective is all-too-grateful its music, now "classics," lives on.
As another summer heads to the airport, my thoughts head back to 1982, when I was a secretary in the Artist & Repertoire (A&R) Department at CBS Records and the song "Goodbye to You" first aired on the radio.
There's a lot more to Jeff Richards than people realize. Over the past decade, the SNL and MADtv alum has been unleashing a series of experimental comedy electro-pop E.P.s accompanied by bizarre and hilarious music videos that harken back to the golden age of MTV when acts like M, Barnes & Barnes and Miss Julie Brown ruled the roost.
Video may have killed the radio star, but never fear, music fans! Bands that were big in the '80s are coming to a stadium near you this summer, for "reunion," "farewell," and "redux" tours -- because the radio star needs to pay for college for his kids, and rebuild the retirement account that was wasted on hookers and blow back in the peak earning years.
My mother has always had a love of music that is infectious, and my memories of the years I spent at home are punctuated with songs from all eras -- Big Band swing to '80s rock.
When the first crappy music makes it into our house, I will sit my kids down, play the entire Pink Floyd discography, then The Beatles, then Simon & Garfunkel. And Bjork. And Death Cab for Cutie. And Arcade Fire. Then The Velvet Underground. Then Talking Heads.
The new-wave acts of the early '80s represent everything that mainstream pop acts aren't so free to be today. Imagine One Direction hitting the stage dressed like Kajagoogoo. Would teenage girls still go wild? Would Taylor Swift have dated one of them?
After a recent performance (and a margarita or two later) I had the pleasure of chatting with Koehler and Brown about the