911-trials

The military commissions have once again cancelled two weeks' worth of hearings scheduled in the case of the five alleged plotters of the September 11 attacks. Although the attacks themselves took place nearly 14 years ago, the five men accused of masterminding the deadliest terror attack to ever take place on U.S. soil are still nowhere near trial.
It's time for the U.S. government to put an end to this fiasco. The legitimacy of such important terrorism cases as the September 11 attacks is not something to be disregarded, nor is the impact on the victims' families, who have yet to see justice done. All the military commission cases could be reliably tried in the seasoned and successful U.S. federal court system.
Minutes before he would learn his prison sentence for aiding al Qaeda before, during, and after 9/11, Suleiman Abu Ghaith decided once again to threaten the United States.
Accused terrorists are tried all the time in U.S. federal courts with little extra burden on security officers and without incident. Only in the case of the five alleged perpetrators of the September 11 attacks did the plan cause such an uproar that their case was moved to another country.
When Col. John Bogdan took the witness stand at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, he'd been called to testify about the strict limits he's imposed on defense attorneys' visits with their death penalty clients. The attorneys representing the defendants accused of masterminding the 9/11 terrorist attacks claim his rules make their jobs unreasonably onerous.
As a 9/11 family member who paid dearly when my daughter went to work, I am hoping that this time, in my home city, the rule of law prevails. I hope this time, my fellow Americans give me and other 9/11 families our day in court.
Under questioning from defense lawyer James Connell on the second day of a pre-trial hearing at Guantanamo, Elkins said conversations
Testimony from the special 9/11 courtroom at Guantanamo Bay this morning confirmed what defense lawyers have been complaining about for weeks now: The microphones in the courtroom are sensitive enough to pick up lawyers' conversations with their clients.
Pohl continued, "It is the judge that controls the courtroom." Defense attorneys for the detainees said later Thursday that
The defendants in the 9/11 case, including the alleged mastermind of the hijacked plane plot, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and