A Midsummer Night's Dream

June 2016 brings us to the halfway moment, the middle, the mid, indeed a season of midsummer nights, 'looking before and after'. So it would seem apt that it is A Midsummer Night's Dream that, for so many of us, captures more than any other of his plays the width and wisdom of all that is Shakespeare.
Shakespeare's lushest, loopiest play, set in an Athenian June at court and in the green wood, is essentially a long poem. In even a poor production, the words can get you through.
The Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski In this extraordinary retelling of Hamlet, Edgar Sawtelle leads an idyllic
In his preface to Miss Julie Strindberg talked about "new wine" bursting "the old bottles." Arthur Miller's A View From the
In Shakespeare, as in myths and stories throughout the ages, forests are magical and transformative places. Weavers grow ass-heads in Shakespeare's woods. Lovers elope. They write reams of passionate letters and fall in and out of love there.
Julie Taymor's latest triumph is the movie version of the play, A Midsummer Night's Dream, she debuted in 2013 at the Theater for a New Audience in Brooklyn.
We may not even have realized it, but half the year has already gone by and still so much to be done. Now, with the coming of June, we can look forward to longer days and more time to do the things we love to do.
George Lucas has turned his charms onto the tale, Strange Magic, a new animated film, that is a madcap fairy tale musical inspired by Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream.
Directed by Mark Kenward, the performance that I attended at the 2014 San Francisco Fringe Festival of Caggiano's new monologue felt like a crash landing that kept passing through a series of green spotlights as it bumped and lurched down an ill-fated runway.