A Nation at Risk

The state of our education still is not strong. With the president’s speech before Congress bringing a renewed focus on how
The shortcomings of our K-12 system carry over into the postsecondary years at considerable cost. We still have too many instances of social promotion where high school diplomas go to "graduates" who can't do third-grade math.
We assume that low achievement indicates a poor school when, in fact, it is merely proof of a neglected community. We persistently fail to address the economic and social injustices that created the community and then we blame schools and teachers for the mayhem we have enabled.
Improving teaching and learning in the classroom should have been the focus of attention, not tests and charter schools. "Fast and dirty" solutions, such as pressuring teachers to raise test scores, were a mistake.
School administrators have responded to their impossible challenge by dumbing down standards, overstating progress and otherwise trying to fake success.
As the authors of A Nation at Risk pointed out more than 30 years ago, America's students simply do not spend enough time in quality learning environments to reach the high expectations of the modern global economy.
Born at the dawn of the Reagan era, Millennials were the first generation to be fully subjected to the all-out assault of the idea that we take care of each other in this country. Some of us are the parents of Millenials, and we wonder: who will fight with them, and for them?
On state report cards, we get an A for being bike friendly and an A+ for hazelnut production. But Education Week gives us a C on its report card and ranks us 43rd in the nation for education based on numerous factors including how we treat teachers.
The fundamental policy question today is precisely what it was in 1983: If we are outspending the rest of the world on education, why aren't we out-performing the rest of the world?
In an interview, Weingarten noted that countries that are out-performing the U.S. didn't get there by following the commission's