a. philip randolph

If the political pundits would look around, they would even discover a significant number of prominent U.S. democratic socialists at work in a variety of fields. These and many other democratic socialists, among them Bernie Sanders, have played an important role in American life.
What the corporate media cannot see is that the era of the Bill Clinton "New Democrat" is finished. In the real world, the crash of 2008 blew the lid off the bipartisan "Washington consensus" with its blind faith in the benevolence of capitalism. But now I see a silver lining in the absurdity of the "permanent campaign": Bernie Sanders has a whole year to build a vibrant, multifaceted social movement.
The billionaire Republican Governor of Illinois, Bruce Rauner, injected himself into ceremonies in Chicago last week presided over by the city's Democratic mayor and the nation's Democratic president.
This Black History Month, let's celebrate and honor Black history by recognizing and committing to all of the work we have still to do. No one is equal until we are all equal.
During Black History Month, I'm reminded yet again of the ways that the struggle for civil rights is interwoven with the struggle for workers' rights. Perhaps no one better personifies that link than A. Philip Randolph, the first African-American inducted into the Labor Department's Hall of Honor.
In fact, King was a radical. He believed that America needed a "radical redistribution of economic and political power." He challenged America's class system and its racial caste system.
Du Bois was one of the towering intellectual figures of the 20th century. Fifty years after his death, his ideas -- and his activism for economic and social justice -- remain an important influence on American culture.
In its own way, the HBCU made the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom possible. Today's HBCU must make meaning of its legacy for its students, who must work tirelessly to usher in a better society and more just world.
As the nation commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the March on Washington, the monumental nature of what the “Big Six
50 years ago, thousands of people marched in a fight for equality and justice. This week HuffPost Live commemorates the historical movement by taking a look at its organizers and the motives behind the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.