A Raisin In The Sun

Lorraine Hansberry's "A Raisin in the Sun," directed by Phyllis B. Gitlin for the Long Beach Playhouse's Mainstage Theatre, presents a compelling look at the choices an African-American family face at the dawn of the Civil Rights era.
I often travel through the Chicago O'Hare airport which triggered thoughts about women from Illinois and their contributions through history.
The play debuted in 1959 but the enduring theme remains: inner wealth is the foundation for outer wealth.
These actors and actresses slayed the stage!
The majority population, most of whom pollsters tell us did not believe Officer Wilson committed any crimes, may believe the country can afford to accept things as they are. People of color -- Black men and their families and those who depend on them cannot afford that luxury. They need us to get this right.
While each of these dramas deals with weighty issues, it's no surprise to hear the audience frequently laughing during the performance. Is it because one man's tragedy is another man's comedy? Or because human beings, in their most fallible moments, are a constant source of wonder and entertainment?
While many great moments occurred during the telecast, go to Parade to read about eight behind-the-scenes responses you may have missed.
On June 2, the fifth annual Lilly Awards Ceremony lit up Playwrights Horizons. The Lilly Awards, affectionately called "The Lillies," were founded in 2010 by Julia Jordan, Marsha Norman, and Teresa Rebeck to honor the work of women in the theater.
Broadway is having a banner year, and for the first time in a while, new American plays are a significant part of the lineup. If you let it wash through you, this surreal and satisfying one act has more to say about modern existence than could ever be conveyed simply with plot.
Plucking the dialogue pretty much verbatim from his best-selling book, Steinbeck handily transferred his tale to the stage. Again George and Lennie -- traveling together like the scores of other bindlestiffs scouring California's Salinas Valley (Steinbeck's version of William Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County) for work -- arrive at a farm for barley bucking activity.