A Streetcar Named Desire

Like a moth to the flame, Blanche DuBois, opens the show as a curious creature drawn to a single light bulb; a stunning piece
Pacino and Brando -- from The Annotated Godfather Grosso had previously gone nationwide doing publicity for the book, and
Although there's much to praise in the Young Vic-Joshua Andrews co-production of Tennessee Wiliams's superb A Street Car Named Desire, now transported to St. Ann's Warehouse, the laurels go mostly to the cast. About other prominent aspects, there's much to question.
"The general rule of thumb is the better body you have, the more casual your clothes can be."
The director of the new doc on how he came to know the mysterious star.
It was one of those "frozen-slowed-car-crash-uh-oh" kind of moments... I passed within a foot or two of him, not wanting to make a big deal out of it, trying to respect his privacy, but all the same probably staring at him all the while.
They almost had to hose down the audience at intermission of Scottish Ballet's A Streetcar Named Desire at the Harris Theater in Chicago on Thursday night. Erik Cavallari's Stanley had just had make-up sex with Sophie Martin's Stella, and choreographer Annabelle Lopez Ochoa's imaginative way with the erotic pas de deux had everyone hot and bothered.
Nick Payne's Constellations arrives at the Manhattan Theatre Club's Samuel J. Friedman after winning the 2012 Evening Standard Theatre Award for Best Play and receiving a clutch of rave reviews that encouraged the move from its initial production at London's Royal Court to the West End.
Bright, shiny, new streetcars that convey "choice riders" around town are typically seen as a boon in any urban area. But the truth is that today's streetcars are making transit worse. It's time that municipal governments face up to the theft of public transit resources that the new streetcar lines really are.
The next time you attend the opera, as the lights dim and the orchestra strikes up, why not determine to devote that evening an extra measure of attention to the opera going on in the pit?
Often, when we envision a damsel in distress we imagine characters like the protagonist of the 1914 silent film serial entitled The Perils of Pauline, Lois Lane hoping to be rescued by Superman, or the beefy Belle Rosen demonstrating her swimming technique in 1972's The Poseidon Adventure.
Approaching the age of 80, with more than 40 feature films under his belt, Woody Allen continues to astonish, finding new ways to surprise audiences with each year's film.
I have not acted in a legit show on Broadway since A Streetcar Named Desire in 1992, having chosen the not-for-profit route on Broadway or regional for my last four shows. Broadway has changed in the past 21 years and I wanted take a moment to look at that.
A Streetcar Named Desire is a dark play -- I thought only the Russians wrote such bleak, depressing things -- but the dreamy beauty of Fleming makes it shine.
Chan-wook Park's Stoker is audaciously, in-your-face creepy and exhilarating in a way few films have been since David Lynch's Blue Velvet. Because it's not just the creepiness -- but the way Park gets you involved in his world so that you can't look away.
Boris Kodjoe is charismatic, personable and knows how to work the room. He commands attention, but not in the "Hey, look at me!" kind of way. His swagger, his smile and warm, inviting demeanor make everyone take notice.
With all of the activity on the stage, the controversy behind the scenes highlights the failures of "post-racial" America to move past the lines that divide the masses and the elite. In many ways, this is a common clash between whites and people of color.