aaron burr

The Tony winner also reveals the No. 1 reason he's grateful for the hit musical.
American politics has always been a full-contact sport. But it has crossed a line in recent years. It is now less like sport and more like war.
Tickets to Chicago performances just got even harder to find.
So in the waning moments of a chilly NYC Sunday morning in early May, you pick yourself up, spot your pants in the distance, and find in them the trusty Pilot Razor Point pen that was supposed to have prompted you to crank out the Great American Novel by the first quarter of 2016. You take that pen, and you make a list of Spring Resolutions.
Journalist and author Cokie Roberts says that philandering liar Alexander Hamilton is still making women wait their turn to assume their rightful place on the front of American currency.
She's the woman who dueled with Aaron Burr and won. Move over Alexander Hamilton. The life of Eliza Jumel is a tale about a woman who pulled hard on her Yankee bootstraps to make good on the American dream.
The push-pull of their competing visions still fuels our politics, but we live in Hamilton's world, not Jefferson's.
Alexander Hamilton was heretofore best known as the fellow etched in green on the ten-dollar bill; one of two major Founding Fathers. Now a play fills in the blanks, showing us an orphan bastard immigrant from the West Indies who became General Washington's "right-hand man."
If people see their ancestral experience integrated -- not just mentioned in a checklist kind of way, but fully integrated into the larger narrative -- then they are far more likely to see that larger narrative of American history as something that speaks to them.
The show has been impeccably staged by Thomas Kail, Miranda's colleague from In the Heights, with choreography from that show's Andy Blankenbuehler. For theatergoers who admired but didn't love In the Heights, be advised that Hamilton is nothing like it.
If we ever hope to sponsor a productive debate in this country, we will have to spend as much time listening as we do talking. Grandstanding, posturing, and trash-talking the country is not helping.
Even if an errant-tweet is music to your scandal-hungry ears, you may have actually missed some of the most knock-down, bare-knuckled, ugly tweet wars in history.
Imagine giving our Founding Fathers, some of the most learned and intelligent men in history, a tool like Twitter. Would humility win the day or would the draw of casting immediate stones outweigh etiquette?
Aaron Burr was a victim of his own nonpartisanship, his openness to working with political opponents as well as allies. Burr's story illustrates that Americans love nonpartisanship in principle but often disdain it in practice.
If good intentions and a lively imagination were all that counted, the documentary Rediscovering Alexander Hamilton would be a masterwork.
As we set out to make an historical documentary on Alexander Hamilton, our goal was to make a different kind of history film. We've all seen Ken Burns narrations or History Channel reenactments, so it's time for something new.