abacus

Remarkably, Goldman Sachs, one of the richest, most powerful, politically connected (aka Government Sachs) too-big-to-fail Wall Street banks, has demonstrated a Teflon-like ability to bounce back from egregious misdeeds, if not outright illegal conduct, and horrible publicity.
The trial this week of Fabrice "Fabulous Fab" Tourre is almost guaranteed to accomplish nothing but highlighting the weakness of the U.S. government's response to the financial crisis.
As part of our series on generosity in business, we're looking at some of the financial wizards who are using their skills and assets to give back to society in the most impressive and inspiring ways.
The Business editors of the New York Times seem forever determined to whitewash and sanitize one of the core causes of the 2008 financial debacle and those who were central to the melt down.
Yesterday the Justice Department announced that once again it's not going to pursue evidence of Wall Street crimes which has been sent its way.
Casper's airy little fist packed no wallop when it came to impeding high-risk betting on Wall Street, the LIBOR lending rate manipulation or the disappearance of client money at MFGlobal. There's a much better way than Casper to catch a bankster: pay them to turn each other in.
Though JPMorgan's reputation hasn't sunk as low as Goldman's lowest, it's been a pretty bad couple of weeks for the bank
Insurance giant MetLife is suing Morgan Stanley for fraud. The suit, filed in state court in New York on Wednesday, seeks