abdullah abdullah

The U.S. must abandon the corrupt Afghan politicians and warlords, but not all the Afghans. Dealing with the mess in Afghanistan
In the last two years, Afghanistan has been facing unprecedented challenges. However, several major development projects have initiated, launched or completed. But the government has failed to deliver its promises. Thousands of Afghans died in violence.
The Afghan Taliban just announced the launch of a spring offensive against the National Unity Government. This spring offensive, dubbed "Operation Omari," is named to honor the late Taliban leader Mullah Omar who died in 2013, but whose death was kept a secret until last year.
During the last 14 years, we had everything but a leader. To secure the achievements and overcome the massive challenges, it's the right time to review quickly the unprecedented achievements of the last fourteen years as well as the challenges that remain and lie ahead.
It has almost been a year since Afghan president Ashraf Ghani and Afghan chief executive Abdullah Abdullah have been in power. Contrary to the rosy pictures painted at the time, progress on many fronts has been dismal at best.
Xi Jinping announced a $10 million donation to UN Women.
He also hopes Washington won't abandon its friends in Afghanistan.
Roughly half of the 10,600 American troops were supposed to leave by the end of the year, with the rest scheduled to depart in 2016. But the administration has cancelled this year's withdrawal. Carter said he wanted to "make sure this progress sticks."
As President Ghani arrived with his hand out in Washington, the quid pro quo of course being the propping up of his regime for the propping up of the Lie of the Goodness of the Afghan War, Sergeant Bergdahl was tossed to the crowd.
Programs and services to care for and educate vulnerable children need the unanimous support of a government that understands the long-term benefits of doing so.
Afghanistan's finance ministry has warned it will soon run out of money without foreign aid. (Additional reporting by Hamid
It's hard to pinpoint the exact moment when Afghanistan's presidential election became a complete absurdity.
Now, nearing the end of the fourth month of the slow-rolling wreck of this "democratic" Afghan presidential election, we Afghan women have lost our ability to speak. This is not what we women have worked for or voted for or dreamed of, and if we could raise our voices once again, we would not call this "democracy."
Remember those halcyon days of yore, also known as last year, when President Barack Obama's frequently challenged job approval rating was always buttressed by his ratings on foreign policy and geopolitics?
It is 2014 and it is election time in Afghanistan once again. Karzai cannot be a candidate again under the constitutional provisions. The contest now largely hinges between Abdullah Abdullah and Abdul Ghani, both of whom are well-known in Afghanistan.
Afghanistan's presidential election has taken a turn for the worst. Presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah announced his decision to boycott the national election commission and demand the vote-counting process be brought to a grinding halt.
Abdullah also said that he had no inside knowledge of the swap. He made the remarks during a Skype interview at a Washington
It's a terrible precedent for Bergdahl's family to receive threats. Why hasn't the noise machine that put out those false translations been forced to issue a retraction?