Abercrombie & Fitch

LGBTQ Pride Month began as a means for us to fight for our basic human rights.
Gains were driven by a surge in hiring in the leisure and hospitality sector as well as business and professional services.
Abercrombie -- the brand that haunted your middle school days and made you think that wearing two polos stacked on top of each other would suddenly make you popular -- is dying. And I am here to sing its eulogy from the treetops.
Henry Poole himself was long gone even by the time Churchill arrived, but Poole's descendants continue to ply his elegant trade very close by to the family's pioneering original location on Savile Row. I decided to pay them a visit.
We asked bargain experts which retailers were best -- and worst -- for cutting prices during summer on everything from patio furniture and summer fashions to back-to-school supplies and laptops.
When Gurdit Singh was offered a job in 2008 as a mail carrier at Walt Disney World, he was thrilled. On his first day, however, it quickly became apparent that his new job might not be the path to happily ever after he had imagined.
We are in a world where everyone needs to be treated equally and every small business owner must provide a workplace that is fair and accommodating. A new generation of workers expect this and smart business owners will understand, adapt and prosper in order to succeed.
The Seventh-day Adventist Church -- with a more than century-long track record of defending religious freedom and the rights of religious minorities -- early on recognized the critical religious liberty implications central to this case.
In an 8-1 decision the United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of a hijab-clad woman who had been denied a job by Abercrombie & Fitch (A&F) based on its "look policy" (which has since been redefined by the company).
Alito said there were ways for an employer to address the issue without directly asking a job applicant about his or her
Womp, womp.
To think that Abercrombie "got away" with celebrating everyone being "the same" in a very diverse world for this long is astounding.
I believe that businesses have the right to promote their business models because that is how they make a profit and turn the cogs of capitalism. But, I also think that businesses cannot infringe on the rights of their employees to practice their respective religious beliefs.
The Seventh-day Adventist church and those diverse organizations who joined our amicus brief hope and pray that the Supreme Court strikes down the Tenth Circuit Court's unreasonable ruling that the burden is on a job applicant to ask for a religious exemption for rules he or she doesn't even know exist.
“Any other rule not only foments tremendous awkwardness in the employer-employee relationship, but puts the employer in the
I have a strong, healthy dose of self-esteem. This is fortunate because recently there has been a steady stream of damaging messages coming from the media, politicians and religious leaders. There are plenty of voices proclaiming that there is something wrong with me.
Say what you want about Abercrombie & Fitch (A&F), the chain has done something special. No, I’m not talking some dazzling
Teens once flocked to Abercrombie, lured by the perceived coolness of the A&F name and trademark moose logo. But the retailer was slow to adapt when fashion trends shifted and customers began shunning logos.
Brandy Melville, the latest addition to the growing list of Lululemons, Abercrombies and American Apparels -- fashion brands who fail to understand that violating cultural sensibilities by propagating unrealistically thin and tall bodies can undermine their brand's value.
A lower court ruled in her favor, saying Abercrombie was liable for religious discrimination. Then, an appeals court reversed