academic publishing

New videos show kangaroo rats doing moves straight out of "The Matrix."
The music business was killed by Napster; movie theaters were derailed by digital streaming; traditional magazines are in crisis mode--yet in this digital information wild west: academic journals and the publishers who own them are posting higher profits than nearly any sector of commerce.
Not so long ago anything but a peer-reviewed article or book printed by an established academic press was all that found its way onto a curriculum vitae. But times are changing exponentially fast.
I have several friends who are brilliant, dedicated academics. They write excellent books, teach at colleges and universities, and are standouts in their fields. You might want to know where they are speaking next and what they are currently researching, but you'd be hard-pressed to find them on the web.
This allows scientists to include the article as a published paper on their CV and cite their work, without ever having to worry that someone else might read the article.
Swartz was accused of attempting to publicly release academic papers from the digital library JSTOR, which potentially could
The world of academic publishing is complicated and not always in the best interests of the academic or the public who has to pay to access articles. Jessica Richman, John Willinsky and Sarah Kendzior discuss this topic with Marc Lamont Hill.
Scientists and engineers representing a wide variety of cross-disciplines can debate research findings in online forums, and society will ultimately benefit from the resulting scientific discourse that will open up limitless new avenues for search and discovery.
One system being developed is the Selected-Papers Network ("SP net"), a sort of Pinterest for peer-review in which researchers with common interests across the sciences can subscribe to one another to share 'must-read' articles and reviews.