active listening

Do you always encourage your kids to say whatever they want or do you censor them?
Two people can look at the same situation at the same time yet still see different things. For this reason, among many, humans
Michelangelo perfectly captures that moment. David is holding his rock, knowing that he has the skill to take down the giant. He has an expression of calm equanimity and confidence. His whole being is saying, "I can do this. I've got it."
Listening makes the other person feel important and respected.
Dave Kerpen, Founder & CEO of Likeable Local, a social media agency and NY Times best-selling author recently published; "The Art of People: 11 Simple People Skills That Will Get You Everything You Want."
One bad apple can disrupt a work environment and wreak havoc on communication, trust, and collegial relationships -- not to mention productivity. Protecting your team with a "No Jerks" hiring policy is smart and goes a long way to cultivating and preserving a harmonious and high functioning workplace.
Eye contact can connect two people without using words. But, it can also be misinterpreted. The level of eye contact that
As a cross-cultural strategist, I predominantly work with multinational corporations, providing their global teams with tools and training to help them optimize the collaboration they must have across cultures. While some of what I do lies in cross-cultural awareness, a large part of my job is dedicated to helping develop employee and leadership courage.
Whether it is social anxiety, or not knowing how to correctly read other people, there are ways that we can learn and push ourselves that can greatly benefit our interactions with other people. If we can improve these interactions, we can further our social life, our work life, and our relationships.
I have mentioned elsewhere how the best recruiter I ever knew was a great listener. All the people I really respect and trust
How often do you listen to the woes of a friend of family member, and do only that: just listen? While many of us want to try to offer a solution and help solve problems for others, active listening may just be the biggest gift you can offer to someone else.
A very important part of improv is listening. I was reminded of this a while ago when my second child was only two years old. He was being fussy while I was changing his diaper. I asked him, “Is it hard being a little kid sometimes?” He said, “Yeah.” I asked, “What’s hard about being a little kid?” What he said stopped me in my tracks.
Coaching people is like cooking: recipes take us only so far. To figure things out, we have to chuck a few noodles against the wall to see what sticks.
I've become afraid I might have nothing to show my future children if they ask what I was doing to fight against a demagogue while he was approaching the presidency.
In the true sense of the coaching inquiry, we are simply interested in what is going on and how others are seeing things
This idea of hearing what other people say is brilliant. I wish I had come up with it myself. On my final day in the cruise ship diner I pointed to the menu and asked if I could have the roller skate salad with a rubber squeegee on the side. My waiter gave me a big smile. "Yes." That was nice. This time I smiled back. I'm still waiting.
After you know the right people, who those people are, and have taken the time to listen to them, you can then easily transition to being understood. The key to being understood is to clearly and concisely convey what you are interested in doing.
When you disagree with someone about something you feel strongly about, do you promptly move into high persuasion gear to try to get the person to see it your way? Doing this both creates emotional distance between the two people. It also closes off the possibility of learning something new.