Ad Reinhardt

She sold her first painting when she was 89 years old. And she has no time for patriarchal bulls**t.
While it skews predictably toward a New York-centric perspective, it succeeds in many ways by introducing the works of lesser-known or hitherto marginalized artists alongside canonical classics.
There's seemingly nothing to be seen in or on them except for one color (or white or black) and some texture, maybe.
If you haven't seen this series of videos, they're a great learning/teaching resource on the painting techniques of the Abstract Expressionists -- specifically Pollock, Newman, Rothko, Reinhardt and Kline -- by Corey d'Augustine of The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
And in neighboring spaces are a 17-foot-high black wax-surfaced American flag sculpture that appears to be crashing through the gallery's floor and a poignantly solemn detail image of the riderless horse that led JFK's funeral procession.
As always, New York City has a lot to see. On the blue-chip side of the fence, be sure to see Brice Marden's show of graphite drawings at Matthew Marks, and David Zwirner's inaugural exhibition of works by Ad Reinhardt.
John Bauer grew up immersed in the primal, face to face with the concept of the infinite, as a surfer raised in the beach culture of La Jolla, in Southern California. To hear him describe his experience of the ocean is to glimpse the conceptual existentialism in his work.
One evening in June at the Cedar Tavern in 1956, a drunken Jackson Pollock pulled Franz Kline by the hair off his bar stool, and Kline responded by punching Pollock in the stomach, doubling him over. Just another night in the art world.
HuffPost Arts' Haiku Reviews is a weekly feature where invited critics review exhibitions and performances in short form
For centuries we have wondered, what is art? Many nights we've tossed and turned pondering this unsolvable question. And