ada lovelace

Cargo pants can be hazardous to your life. Once the go-to pants for men who don't carry purses -- cargo pants are a problem for a growing segment of boomers and geezers.
This applies especially to heroines and celebrities: women placed on a pedestal have a hard time climbing off it to relate
Much of the dramatic conflict in two recent Bay area productions was caused by the fallout from an arranged marriage that seemed destined to please a lot of people. Unfortunately, the bride was not one of them.
A nursery rhyme from the 19th century claims that "Little girls are made of sugar and spice and all things nice." If one took Maurice Chevalier's words to heart, there would certainly be good reason to "Thank Heaven For Little Girls."
Something is askew here: The notion that strength is the main thing we want, or need, or care about. Though the word "strength" can be vague or misleading, it doesn't help to change terms and propose that we want women who are agents rather than mere instruments or objects.
Ada Lovelace Day is an opportunity to celebrate women in the STEM fields. Is there still such a need to talk about them? If we look back at a number of attention-grabbing headlines on topics over the past year, there's still a lot to talk about.
Ada Lovelace, I imagine, would have much to say about the dearth of girls and women interested in tech. She would argue that the math and science we teach need to be not only meaningful but also as creatively engaging as the writing of Flyology was for her.
It's no secret that the tech industry has been dominated by men. But did you know a woman is responsible for some of the core innovations that drive the internet today? In 1843, Ada Lovelace published instructions for the world's first computer program.
Gender bias is real and it is worse in engineering. Even engineering students rate average female professors more harshly than an average male professor.
Lady Ada Lovelace was a remarkable scientist of unparalleled charm and allure. In 1833, Ada was highly intrigued with an idea for an "Analytical Engine" -- a mechanical calculating machine whose design predated the digital computer by over 100 years.
In the parlance of modern movies, Walter Isaacson's new book had me at "Ada Lovelace." She's the woman who outlined the very first computer algorithm, and envisioned computer programs that could make art, even music. All this back in 1843.
It was an auspicious start for women in technology, but unfortunately, more than 170 years later, women remain woefully under-represented in technology and little funding is steered toward them.
Supposing, for instance, that the fundamental relations of pitched sounds in the science of harmony and of musical composition
Let Ada inspire many more modern-day "Enchantress of Numbers" to come to light.
As I write this, I watch our team of staff and volunteers slowly black out Wikipedia, and I realize what women would have to lose if this blackout became permanent.
Many are world famous, others almost completely forgotten: the only criteria for inclusion were that they be both dead -- and interesting.
As one of the first prominent women in mathematics, Ada Lovelace holds a special place in my heart. Like her, I am lucky enough to have discovered an affinity and talent for mathematics at a young age.
I don't know what exactly will motivate more girls to study the sciences, and I don't know what will close the representation gap so those who have already dedicated their livelihoods to being skilled engineers, product managers and tech entrepreneurs are properly credited for their work.