adjunct professors

One of the biggest ironies about Donald Trump's Presidential campaign is his pledge to bring back jobs that have been outsourced to other countries--the major driver behind his support from blue-collar workers.
We know we're paying significantly more than our parents ever did to reach the same end goal -- a degree. So naturally, in true Michael Moore fashion, we ask ourselves: where's the majority of our money going? If your response has anything to do with learning, think again.
Who's to blame for abysmal graduation rates according to the AAUP's recently released Report on the Economic Status of the Profession? Adjunct faculty, of course.
You read stories all the time about adjunct college professors who quit because they're badly paid, worked too hard, don't have health insurance, and don't even have get decent office space. They love what they do, but eventually the negatives make their jobs impossible.
The nationwide movement for better pay and benefits expands to the South.
The major argument for free public college and university education is the same as for free public education in general: like the free public elementary, middle, and high schools already existing in the United States, free public higher education provides educational opportunity for all.
In a time when college enrollment is booming and college tuition is at an all-time high, the prospect of getting an upper-level degree and working at a college or university would seem like a sure bet for anyone. And yet, in 2015, a PhD does not guarantee a great living.