Adlai Stevenson

Every age has its own preferred terms of political emasculation. Teddy Roosevelt called Woodrow Wilson a “white-handy Miss
Trump knows that white blue-collar voters will overlook his economic portfolio if they think he understands their values and needs rather than trying to imitate them.
To me, true patriotism is to align oneself with the ideas this country was built upon.
To contrast the virtues and shortcomings of Stevenson and Eisenhower with those of Hillary Rodham Clinton and Donald Trump is both instructive and profoundly depressing.
Looking into the hidden corners of a drawer the other day, I came across two pins from the past. One was a souvenir of my high school, the Bronx High School of Science in New York City. I applied there at the urging of the guidance counselor at my junior high school, Hermann Ridder.
On April 19th New Yorkers' have the chance to make Hillary Rodham Clinton the nominee of the Democratic Party. All of us New Yorkers, no matter where we live, whose hearts will always belong to New York, know they will do this resoundingly.
Never have two things so reflective of who we are and where we are as a country come along together.
Democratic insiders immediately hailed Stevenson's credentials and his charmingly well-worn shoes, while scholars and historians noted the Constitution says nothing about living people who were once previously dead being ineligible to serve as president.
And if you're a Holmes fan, this book is probably a must in the canon. Dan Simmons delivers personal details about Holmes' upbringing you may not have read before. The author details Holmes' fascination with the new wonder drug from the Bayer company. No, not aspirin.
Scott Walker is one of a very small number of Presidential candidates to have been catapulted into the national spotlight by a single galvanizing issue or event. Walker's challenge to public sector unions struck a nerve with rank-and-file Republicans, as well as with Libertarian-oriented Tea Party voters and GOP benefactors.
When Mitt Romney made his announcement that he wouldn't make another presidential run (for now), it didn't take long for pundits to add their thoughts. Some pointed out that Reagan won on his third presidential campaign. But the other 12 who tried since 1952 didn't.
Memo to Grimes and Nunn and the rest of the sad parade of upsets-that-never-were: Most of you knew damn well you were almost certain to lose the second you decided to run. But rather than accept it, you saw that utter likelihood as a reason to double down.
For the baby boom generation -- one of which I am and so is President Putin -- those crises were critical to the formation of our views of the world.
It has been fifty years and I keep waiting for the next Kennedy. But then I realize it is for future generations to find their own Kennedy, the person who will excite them enough to enter public service.
It can be very unsettling. Consider what was widely described as a great problem for Al Gore when he ran against George W. Bush in 2000: most folks would rather, it was said, go out for a beer with Bush than Gore.
As 1952 and 1956 Democratic presidential nominee Adlai E. Stevenson reminds us: "All progress has resulted from people who took unpopular positions."
Fifty years ago this week, much changed for me, my family and the rest of America. As a nation and a world, we had stared down the barrel of nuclear destruction. However, it seems clear that 50 years after the Cuban Missile Crisis we are not much closer to banishing the threat of nuclear war.
Simply put, the LBJ I knew hungered for power, and knew he knew how to use it. The Kennedy I knew grudgingly but genuinely admired LBJ's ability. Robert Caro's book reminded me of a sad conversation I had with LBJ during the time he was languishing in the vice presidency.