adoptee

National Adoption Awareness Month minimizes individual experiences of adoptees and masks the deeper systemic problems that keep the practice in existence.
Hallie Wunsch was searching for her birth mother, but she found her sisters instead.
Sponsored by National Geographic's "The Story of Us With Morgan Freeman"
As a transracially adopted person, many things in my life take on additional layers and meaning; my identity, my relationships and my hair. Holidays are no different.
It's 11:30 p.m. at night, and I'm sitting in bed, bawling my eyes out (silently). Why? I can't even pick up my thoughts. For
As a 19-something-year-old adoptee living in a Western society, I've often been thrown the phrase, "you're so lucky!" after telling someone I'm adopted.
I'm not sure if anyone or anything can ever really prepare you for all of the trials that come with loving someone who cooks for a living.
Mother ceaselessly sought to mentally destroy me as a prepubescent, because I was the outlet most handy and available to absorb the pain of her losses and dereliction.
A ceaseless fire burned in me to find you, to see your face, hear your voice. I wondered if I found you whether you could learn to love me a teeny bit, if perhaps you could find some room in your heart to spare.
One day, my walls will come down. But, for now, my heart remains protected and imprisoned--waiting for the day when the feelings of security are able to calm the overwhelming fears and the feelings of pain and loss are no more.
A New York bill allowing adults who were adopted as children to obtain access to their original birth certificates, was "destroyed" by members of the NY State Assembly before it passed by a 125-19 vote on June 18, according to members of the group New York Adoption Equality.
Adoption is a multi-faceted, complex phenomenon replete with conundrums. No matter how happy, every adoption begins with a tragedy of loss and separation. Yet some adoptive parents and the general public cling to preconceived, romanticized notions of adoption, seeing it through a narrow one-dimensional lens that is distorted by myth.
As the visit was winding down and we got up to leave, Bio Mom was crying. I felt terrible that I felt nothing for her.
So much of who we are is made up of our experiences and the people we've known. But I can't help but think the picture would be more complete if I knew more about the events leading up to June 19, 1954.
What I immediately noticed in the reunification story of Jessica Long is that there were no hyphens. I watched her parents, here in the states, talk about her family in Russia. They didn't talk about her meeting her birth-mother. I never heard them say birth-father.