Adrienne Rich

Outlandish as it seems to say now, the time may soon come when women will be grateful for the all-out misogynistic campaign that Donald J. Trump has run.
Calling forth an identity -- speaking as a lesbian, as a femme lesbian, as a Jew, as a feminist, as a woman, as a person committed to social justice, as a queer -- requires imagination and courage. Identities name each of us individually and call to others to share in how we understand ourselves in the world.
The death of Adrienne Rich on March 27, 2012, filled me with grief and a profound sense of loss. It took a few months before I could contemplate a tribute issue, but I knew immediately that Sinister Wisdom must do a tribute issue.
"What do you write about?" I'm often asked. The answer, um, is I, uh, write about myself, which automatically puts me in the company of Kim Kardashian, Paris Hilton, and others who exude the belief that their lives are of inherent interest to others.
What is soft? What is hard? What is power? Can power be created or is there a finite amount, a zero sum game that means if I have the power, you do not?
The debates are all about drawing a line in the sand: a line of culture and merit and standards. This is all well and good until you realize that this line is constantly being redrawn, rubbed out, revisited.
The Nation's Ange Mlinko attempted recently to revise the reputation of the late poet Adrienne Rich in a wandering gesture at literary analysis. Readers of this review may find it difficult to tell if Mlinko wishes to gingerly embrace Rich -- or kill her off with a Big Thinky Gun.
Protest is a conversation. It's been a strange, often frustrating, sometimes easy to mock, but essential ethos of American protest movements like #OWS and the Tea Party. And if you think about it, true conversation is democracy.
Men should join in rejecting the attack on reproductive health and insisting on candidates who know the issues around access to contraceptives and abortion and promise to advocate and advance coverage, affordable care, and fairness.
Over the years, critics have justly celebrated her work, and those who dismissed her for her tendentiousness have found themselves on the wrong side of history. The more time you spend with the poems, the more precise and revelatory they seem.