advanced placement

By Annika Grassl The ability to advocate for yourself and others is increasingly important in today’s social and political
Last week at a dinner party, one of the guests, a mother of two successful high school and college students, sighed. “I don’t
The decades-long fight over school choice pits two well-worn arguments: “Students, and by extension our economy, are suffering
Not all students are ready for AP classes at the same time. If you are uncertain about your own preparedness, there are several steps that you can take.
Students change, so colleges are instead looking for dynamic individuals that are open-minded, capable of learning, and able to contribute back to their community. These traits can be show at either a private or public school.
Our communities depend on the quality of educational opportunities to thrive. Yet far too many students in our country never make it to college or arrive on college campuses ill-prepared for the academic rigors of post-secondary course work.
Children who play with piles of Legos, inventing and building as they wish, exhibit far more long-term creativity than children who build things from Lego kits. Rearranging Legos from a messy pile is a better learning experience than working from a kit with directions (unless you're in a hurry and hope to use the finished Lego product as a household appliance).
"All lives matter" is a trite rejoinder to "black lives matter" and diminishes the ugly reality of racism. It is a classic and childish false equivalence. Of course "all lives matter." But white lives have never "not mattered."
Left-leaning historians and high school social studies teachers are furious over the announced changes in curriculum for Advanced Placement United States History classes. They charge College Board succumbed to political pressure from the right, and of course they are correct.
Conservatives thought the last update didn't paint a positive enough picture of the country.
Several members of the conservative National Association of Scholars have again taken aim at the Advanced Placement U.S. History curriculum, claiming it omits or minimizes religious influences in America and the free-enterprise system and ignores Republican heroes like Ronald Reagan. But is that really the case?
Expanded A.P. helps students, who might otherwise be denied an opportunity to improve their writing and critical thinking skills, to learn challenging skills for mastery. Isn't that also supposed to be the purpose of Common Core -- providing college readiness learning opportunities?
What does it mean to be college and career ready? It is often cited as the desired outcome for K-12 education, although too few students leave high school fully prepared for college or the workforce.
Debates are sizzling about the efficacy of American education in preparing students for the global economy. Graduates face escalating competition as millions of recent job entrants hit the market from expanding middle-class economies such as India, China and Brazil.
In a season focused on gratitude, 17-year-old Monica Chica has an attitude about choosing to be grateful that's wise far beyond her years: "The most important lesson I learned is that being happy is not about having with you what you loved in the past, but learning to love what you have in the present."
The brave Colorado high school students who are protesting their school board's attempt to rewrite their American history curriculum are doing all Americans a favor. They are reminding us of the importance of dissent and protest in our nation's history.