advice for college students

"As a freshman college student entering a new journey in your adult life, this is your opportunity to start over in life
At first, college can be very scary. It’s normal to be overwhelmed.
It's been ten years since I've graduated from college. Those years were indeed some of the best years of my life, but I'll always have a few lingering regrets about the financial choices I made.
During the first night of orientation at my college everyone gathers on the quad and we hold an event called "1355 Nights," marking the number of nights we have before graduation. Now, as a senior, we recently held "100 Nights" counting down the nights we have left before we leave.
The cost of college is not declining. And with the constant reminder that student loan debt is getting out of hand, parents and students are trying to find ways to make higher education more affordable. Even so, some families may not even realize that they are voluntarily increasing their expenses.
"What's the opportunity here?" This is the phrase that was playing in my mind after a conversation with my daughter, who is, in her own right, a talented writer and editor -- with the possibility to also become a publisher in the future.
You are done with what society has "required" you to do. What's left is what YOU require yourself to do. That can seem scary and daunting and utterly oblivious to you right now, and that's precisely the way it should be, I think. Of course, I have a few words of advice that might help.
It's about that time again. Sleepy college towns will begin to awaken, abuzz with an excitement that only college students can inspire. Young scholars will soon arrive on college and university campuses, ready, or not so ready, to take on the world of higher education.
It is my responsibility as a president to remind our students that our portable devices should never derail building relationships or limit the experiences that are the hallmarks of an in-person, on-campus higher education experience.
It's graduation season, and time for inspirational and lofty speeches. But high school grads, I'm here to keep it real and give you more pragmatic advice. Here are the ten practical things I wish I'd known when I was heading off to college.
First-year students want a friend group. And they want it immediately. If a student doesn't have one, was ditched by one, or is in the process of seeking a new one, college can be a very lonely place.
Planning ahead at age 15 is a difficult concept for most young men. Here are some tips that I hope are helpful for my nephew and other young men (and women too!) who are starting to plan their own roadmaps for the future.
Most would advise our generation to find your passion. I would advise you to find your passions. It's likely that you have more than one, as I do, and it's important that you recognize when and in what setting you're at your best.