African American art

Four African-American artists got together and purchased the singer-activist's home in North Carolina.
See their work. Know their names. Learn their stories.
"Someone asked me, "'Why do you write?' And I said, 'Because I wanted to tell people how I became this woman with razor blades between her teeth.'"
There's an abundance of reasons to visit the current set of exhibitions at the Studio Museum of Harlem (the ones on view close on June 8). I'll get to the art itself, but there are some overarching considerations.
Lezley Saar's latest exhibition "Monad" features mixed-media paintings of melancholic Victorian ladies floating through space on cellular vehicles.
A Future for the Cunén People in Guatemala. Sandra Hannen is a passionate humane educator and activist who has worked with
Outside the venue, a very long line winds down and around several blocks. Art aficionados wait patiently in the sun. Inside, the exhibition visitors wander and wonder. THE MARVELOUS SUGAR BABY regally inhabits the space.
Richard Stuart Perkins makes for an easy interview. I had the pleasure of sitting down with the filmmaker and photographer recently. He's talented, sweet, and charming. (It's a shame you don't get to hear his contagious laugh.) We touched on some heavy and important topics.
Seventeen-year-old Tonisha Owens stared wide-eyed at the faded script on an 1854 letter. It was once carried by another 17