AFRICOM

Politics
Africa Command lists 36 U.S. outposts scattered across 24 African countries.
The World Post
[10] United States Census Bureau, "Trade in Goods with Djibouti," accessed 3/27/2016. USAID, "Food Assistance Fact Sheet
Politics
America's most elite forces in Africa operate in what Bolduc calls "the gray zone, between traditional war and peace." In layman's terms, its missions are expanding in the shadows on a continent the United States sees as increasingly insecure, unstable, and riven by terror groups.
Politics
Someday, someone will write a history of the U.S. national security state in the twenty-first century and, if the first decade and a half are any yardstick, it will be called something like State of Failure.
Politics
It's rare to hear one top military commander publicly badmouth another, call attention to his faults, or simply point out his shortcomings. Despite a seemingly endless supply of debacles from strategic setbacks to quagmire conflicts since 9/11, the top brass rarely criticize each other.
Politics
As General David Rodriguez prepares to retire, he has a reason for avoiding attention. His tenure has not only been marked by an increasing number of terror attacks on the continent, but questions have arisen about his recent testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee.
Politics
Rejecting both accurate accounting and actual accountability, the Defense Department has demonstrated a longstanding commitment to keeping Americans in the dark about the activities being carried out with their dollars and in their name.
Politics
While the U.S. has always pursued parts of its imperial strategy in "the shadows," to use a phrase from my Cold War childhood, in this new strategy everyday basing, too, is disappearing into those shadows, which is why Nick Turse's latest piece on the subject is a small reportorial triumph of time and effort.
Politics
In remote locales, behind fences and beyond the gaze of prying eyes, the U.S. military has built an extensive archipelago of African outposts, transforming the continent, experts say, into a laboratory for a new kind of war.
Politics
Since 9/11, Africa has increasingly been viewed by the Pentagon as a place of problems to be remedied by military means. And year after year, as terror groups have multiplied, proxies have foundered, and allies have disappointed, the U.S. has doubled down again and again.
Politics
Really, you didn't hear a peep about all those bases? If you don't get the way this country has garrisoned the planet, if you never notice its empire of bases, there is no way to grasp its imperial nature, which perhaps is the point.
Politics
Nick Turse's new book of investigative reporting reveals that the U.S. military has been involved in one way or another -- "construction, military exercises, advisory assignments, security cooperation, or training missions" -- with more than 90 percent of Africa's 54 nations, despite military spokespersons insistence that the U.S. maintains only one permanent "base."
Politics
U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) went out of its way to obstruct reporting on its sex scandals, and the documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act were so heavily redacted that ink companies must be making a fortune.
Politics
For years, as U.S. military personnel moved into Africa in ever-increasing numbers, AFRICOM has effectively downplayed, disguised, or covered-up almost every aspect of its operations, from the locations of its troop deployments to those of its expanding string of outposts.
Politics
In Africa, when the U.S. military first started moving onto the continent in a significant way, there were almost no Islamic terror organizations outside of Somalia. Now, with AFRICOM fully invested and operational across the continent, count 'em.
Politics
In recent years, the U.S. has been involved in a variety of multinational interventions in Africa, including one in Libya that involved both a secret war and a conventional campaign of missiles and air strikes, assistance to French forces, and the training and funding of African proxies.
Politics
In its shadowy "pivot" to Africa, the U.S. military has compiled a record remarkably low on successes and high on blowback. Is it time to add Chad to this growing list?
Politics
Nearly everywhere in Africa, the U.S. military is in action. However, except in rare cases, like the recent announcement of an "Ebola surge" in Liberia, you would never know it.
The World Post
From 2012 to 2013, the U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence found a 25 percent jump in incidents, including vessels being fired upon, boarded, and hijacked, in the Gulf of Guinea, a vast maritime zone that curves along the west coast of Africa from Gabon to Liberia. Kidnappings are up, too.