agatha christie

House of Spies by Daniel Silva "Another chilling glimpse inside global terror networks from a gifted storyteller." Gabriel
Kenneth Branagh's adaptation of Agatha Christie's whodunit has no steam.
The first adaptation, "Ordeal of Innocence," is slated to star Catherine Keener and Bill Nighy.
The Queen of Crime made her wishes very clear: less wrinkles, less pink.
The peace of mind that washes over readers in a bow-tied Christie denouement is comforting to all, but especially to women.
Christie's unabashed racist views read like a what's what of racial stereotypes, vilification, and condescension in her mystery novels when there's even the faintest mention of a black, and other non-white characters. She seemed to have a special fascination with their hair, eyes, or other physical characters which she found odd, different, and always disgusting.
Lifetime stepped up its game a few weeks ago when they presented the mini-series "War & Peace." It was a beautifully crafted and acted event. Now Lifetime is bringing us "And Then There Were None" based on Agatha Christie's classic novel.
In 20 minutes of coming attractions (not to mention a James Bond-style commercial for beer), I saw more money poured into glamorizing explosives, weaponry and commercialized violence than I'd witnessed in quite some time.
Call them thrillers, crime or detective fiction; all of these and the slang term, whodunits, have been used to describe the mystery or crime story. Readers, it seems, love a good mystery.
There's one mystery that has always intrigued and infuriated mystery buffs in equal measure, and that is the real-life disappearance of the Queen of Mysteries herself, Agatha Christie, back in 1926.
The light wanes and we watch the green hills and the tide shifting as if it were a film. An hour passes like one minute.
I was delighted to have the chance to chat with Aidan earlier this week, just in time for the Poldark season one finale episodes airing on PBS this Sunday. Handsome but humble, gracious and grateful, from all appearances, in the twenty minutes we had together, he's everything you'd hope he would be.
Imagine the last thing you remember is confronting your boyfriend in an agitated state. You wake up, he is dead; you are the prime suspect. Bad trip, eh?
In 2013, it was announced that Hannah would pen an Agatha Christie novel featuring Hercule Poirot, the first new novel in 38 years to feature the world famous detective. The decision to write the novel was endorsed by Christie's estate and publisher.
That's how Serial is supposed to get you: The feeling of true waiting -- something that is lost in our digital culture where all things are instantaneously present simultaneously -- is a novel sensation. Pardon the pun.