aging in place

I can't recall any of those bygone resolutions, except for the perennial promise to lose a few pounds and exercise more. The
Dear Savvy Senior, My husband and I are thinking about making some modifications to our home so we can remain living there
Keeping with what that Housing Strategy recommends, developers are submitting proposals that address the needs outlined in
So, olding for me is about careful listening and learning about what is happening within myself, and then resourcefully and
The concepts behind the age-friendliness and livability movement are taking hold in communities across the country and I
Where I live - a suburban city close to Boston - the Council on Aging (COA) and Department of Senior Services (DSS) are producing
As we get older, freshening up our living space is energizing, but it also becomes important to look at our home as either something that is dragging us down, or something that supports changing needs.
I state some statistics and background, but, how do these relate to Newton, and you and me? Although it may not be noticeable
My parents are thrilled to live in the house where my sisters and I grew up. I enjoy visiting them and look forward to a time when my kids, as grownups, will come home to enjoy a place that's familiar and inviting. But where will that be? I've started to wonder.
UberASSIST is a new option that will allow riders needing an extra hand to request safe and reliable rides and provide additional
As Clare's needs for care increased due to worsening anxiety and confusion in recent months, I had to agree to hire a PDA ... personal daily aide ... in order for her to remain at her ALR. I was told that her ALR did not have sufficient staffing to assist individual residents during meals or to redirect residents who lose focus during activities.
As we age, social contacts tend to decrease due to changes like retirement or the death of friends and family. Declining heath, limited mobility, fixed incomes and the challenge of making new friends can deter us from staying active in the game of life.
As aging adults move into their golden years, having a comfortable and safe home where they can be active, social, healthy, and enjoy life becomes more and more important. And a great deal of these factors depend on where a senior lives.
The old standard of retiring and shuffling off to a retirement community is being re-written by baby boomers who want to enjoy their homes, embrace their communities and age in place as long as they can. By renovating their homes, engaging in the "Village" model, and finding innovative solutions like the Golden Girls Network's Home Companion program, it's now possible for baby boomers to stay in their homes longer.
Unfortunately, there comes a point in most seniors' lives where they cannot manage all their basic needs alone. It varies for everyone depending on their state of health, both mentally and physically. A senior's compromised mobility may make them unable to shop for and prepare meals for themselves.
As futurists debate the merits and risks of new technologies, we know today that technological progress is providing solutions for a new generation of older adults who seek to remain active, contributing and connected to their families, friends and communities.
Why do most Americans have it in their heads that retirement means to take it easy and to back off from life? If you ask a person born in between 1946 and 1964 what retirement means to them, I bet you'd hear a very different perspective. It wouldn't include resting, sitting back, being passive and detaching from life. You'd find the opposite.
Technology-assisted living is not only becoming more widespread, but is particularly appealing given that the vast majority of aging adults prefer to stay in their current home as long as they can.
Have you ever considered living like the characters on The Golden Girls? While the show featuring those four fabulous female housemates has been off the air for years, the lifestyle inspired by the show is a growing national trend.
Happy 50th birthday, Medicare! In just 15 years, you'll qualify for federally funded health insurance. Well, maybe.