aging population

"Patient centered care" is a term that has become ubiquitous in healthcare policy and strategy documents. Today chronic diseases
As the Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging prepares to release the latest version of its widely followed "Best Cities for Successful Aging" rankings index, our Advisory Board is once again calling on U.S. mayors to sign the Center for the Future of Aging Mayor's Pledge.
Studies show that keeping older people engaged in society and helping them to age in a healthy way will have a huge payoff both in economic and social capital.
Boosting seniors' economic contribution is no simple task, but one from which younger generations -- and seniors themselves -- will greatly benefit. The first step, as I explain below, is to harness senior power.
From climate change to Zika to ISIS, it can seem like there are more global challenges than there are people (which is a lot). Clearly, there is no need to create imaginary problems
Along with regular aerobic exercise and weight training, balance exercises are important as we get older (did you know that means from age 35 on?). Such exercises really can help you improve your balance and prevent the possibility of falling.
This resurgence in far-right ideology is partly due to security concerns, but, as in the U.S., is also a response to Europe's legacy economic woes. This far-right momentum, if continued, will prove to be a perverse response to the crises facing Europe, only exacerbating economic pain.
As we age in this new century, more and more of us want to work, as has been well-documented by multiple surveys. So as one imagines livability for today's older Americans, opportunities for work must be at the core.
Population aging is spreading worldwide due to increasing longevity and declining birth rates, resulting in a relative reduction in the proportion of children and an increase in the proportion of older adults in the population.
Automotive and Transportation: RelayRides, Hitch, Uber, Lyft, Getaround, Sidecar The rising need for care and the shrinking
"I've fallen and I can't get up!" You may've laughed along with millions of other Americans in the '90s when the catchphrase from a particularly cheesy Life Alert commercial was parodied over and over again on sitcoms and in the media.
Among previous generations of retirees, mailing a check to a worthy cause was standard operating procedure. Not anymore. The new generation of retirees wants to be more focused in their giving choices, make a strong impact, and apply their talent and skills to improve the world.
You might assume that the wealthier segments of retirees are the most generous. You'd be wrong. Retirees at all income levels give, and those with the lowest and highest incomes give almost equally, in terms of percentage of their household income.
This WHO report marks a revolution because it forces us to recognize that aging isn't just about the old. It's about all of us. And aging is not just about diseases -- but also health and activity, work and financial planning.
Imagine you find yourself living on your own, after years of being surrounded by loved ones and friends. Your house is devoid of conversation. The television is your closest companion. Even an encounter with a salesclerk would be a welcome relief from the solitude.
The Silver Tsunami refers to the takeover of an aging workforce. By 2020, 25 percent of the United States workforce will be comprised of workers age 55 and older. For the first time in history, there will be four generations of employees in the workforce.