agism

Maybe the focus on age is all wrong. I know very grown up 5-year-olds; I know people in their 80s who seem young and people in their 50s who seem old.
To raise awareness about this I have partnered with quilter Heidi Parkes and organizing a call to action tied to Dr. Bill
Ask any woman who is over 40 if they have had to reinvent themselves and my guess is over half of them will say 'yes.' We leave our childhood homes and naively believe we will follow a certain path and eventually get to where we want to go.
Liza Mundy joins HuffPost Live to discuss her piece in the June issue of the Atlantic, “Playing The Granny Card.”
We silly old people have really silly habits, like buying stuff we don't need but that make us feel good about having worked hard for a half century. We pay our taxes. We like participating in the economy. Some of us have expendable income and spend it on bright spring Saturdays.
Americans deserve to know about a presidential prospect's health, and questions about experience and integrity are, of course, legitimate areas of inquiry. But to imply that Hillary -- or any candidate -- should be discounted based on advancing age goes too far. Age is an asset; it's no disqualifier.
What if actresses could stop shaving years as regularly as they do their legs? What if the only numbers that mattered on our resumes referred to how long we stayed at one place? What if we could love without worrying about the birth dates of potential partners?
These days, I catch myself pretending to know what my young colleagues are talking about when they refer to some hot new topliner (that's new school speak for lyricist) with a perplexingly random moniker such as Catnip or Carpeting.
Do people, regardless of their own race and religion and age, have favored (and disfavored) groups that they do not publicly -- or consciously -- proclaim?
We can see concepts and issues of oppression as a wheel with each of the separate spokes representing the numerous forms, which continually trample over the rights and the very lives of individuals and entire groups of people.
I challenge the media to start the conversation with and about people over 40. We have the money to spend. Make us use it! Let's let them know we want to go to the movies, see great theater, buy songs, read books and watch comedy in the clubs!
"I have a problem with the cover. She looks so young! It's like we're showing favoritism." It was at this point, dear reader, that the whistle was deployed.
When it comes to a startup's success, being able to contribute experience and insight is almost as valuable as a unique idea or substantive funding.
Elders are revered for their experience and wisdom in many cultures around the globe, but here in America where our civic, media and business cultures worship at the fountain of youth, elders are seen in quite a different light.
Steven shared a few stories with me, and I was surprised by how often he actually deals with heterosexism in the entertainment industry. It seems as though he deals with it almost as much as I and my actress friends deal with ageism and sexism on the casting couch!
Most of us will not suffer harm if we are honest about our sexuality or our age. We do, however, suffer psychically, from constant denial of the truth about who or what we.
As someone well into my fifties, the popular aphorism "50 is the new 15" makes me laugh. Who are we kidding? Sure, being 50 today means something different than it did for our parents. But 50 is simply the "new 50!"
Respect should always be part of the any treatment, and when a person is treated solely on the basis of antiquated "age-thinking," there is a problem.
So is this where cougars, short term marriages, early mid-llfe crises and, most of all, an illusion that the years are something to be ashamed of come into play?
Where does this leave the woman "of a certain age?" In a bit of a quandary, to be sure; society has two attitudes on aging: one for men and one for women. Men are "allowed" to age and women are not.