AHIP

“The big insurance lobby is spooked because the public option is back,” said one advocate for a government-run insurance plan.
Anyone who still thinks the Affordable Care Act was a "government takeover of health care" should consider this headline from the news pages of last Thursday's Investor's Business Daily -- a Wall Street publication whose editorial writers have rarely missed an opportunity to bash the healthcare-reform law.
While we know how much insurers and oil and gas companies dole out to political campaigns and lobbyists, we don't have a clue how much of their cash is used to establish front groups or how much of it winds up in the pockets of either pundits for hire or tax-exempt organizations that do their bidding.
As we head into the final stretch before next week's midterm elections, Americans continue to have wide-ranging views of Obamacare, but even many who have an unfavorable view of it say they would rather see Congress improve it than get rid of it.
For the next two months, Californians will to be subjected to a barrage of TV, radio and online ads, which, ironically, they unknowingly will be paying for with their health insurance premiums.
Will Congress act to save taxpayers billions of dollars -- and protect the solvency of the Medicare programs -- by taking on the AMA, the drugmakers and the insurers? Don't hold your breath.
There is one arena in which misleading the public not only is abided but is the norm: politics. In fact, much of what constitutes political discourse in this country is now built on a foundation of dishonesty.
A year-long investigation by the Center for Public Integrity has revealed that health insurers may have fleeced taxpayers out of $70 billion in just five years.
I told the lawmakers and others how my colleagues and I in the health insurance industry worked over several decades to scare
The campaign of fear, uncertainty and doubt -- or FUD, to use its acronym -- continues to this day against the Affordable Care Act, and it will be waged in coming months by cynical politicians who believe it will be the surest way to win votes in November.
Ads supposedly sponsored by the Coalition for Medicare Choices started appearing last week warning that seniors will face higher costs, fewer benefits and a loss of provider choice if Congress and the administration don't take action.
The mainstream media seems to willfully ignore what corporations and other moneyed interests do to get what they want in Washington. As a result of this lack of media interest, Americans remain in the dark.
While all companies are required to report their federal lobbying and Political Action Committee expenditures, that money is just a fraction of what they often spend in the political arena to protect their profits.
When you're shopping for health insurance, wouldn't it be great if you could find out every insurer's claim denial rate? And how much each one spent on lobbying and advertising -- and how much they paid their CEO?
As the video of the hearing shows, instead of allowing me to explain how common industry practices contribute to the dwindling number of small businesses being able to offer coverage, Rep. Blackburn gave me only one-third of one minute to talk when it was her turn to ask questions.
On Friday I was one of three witnesses to testify before a House committee hearing on whether the cost of health insurance will be higher or lower for people who cannot obtain it through their employer when important provisions of the Affordable Care Act go into effect in a few months.
Facing government cuts to one of their cash cows -- private Medicare plans -- health insurance companies have launched a multi-pronged campaign, financed by the customer premiums, to persuade Congress to keep the cuts from going into effect next month.
If you wonder why we spend more money on health care than any other country but have some of the worst health outcomes, you need look no further than the halls of Congress to figure it out.