ahmadinejad

It is hard to understand what all the celebrating in the West is about. Simply that there is an agreement where there had been none? The Iranians should be doing the celebrating -- and they are.
After all, music soothes the savage beast. And there's plenty of wild legislators roaming the government corridors that could use some calming down. Jazz dudes may have found the elixir: jazz is Xanadu minus the Xanax.
The Leveretts are ideally positioned to champion the case for normalizing relations between the United States and Iran -- a case that desperately needs to be both made and heard in Washington. Lamentably, their ideological contortions get in the way and derail the effort.
Prior to my first trip to Iran in March 2005, when I was invited to speak at the country's First International Children's
This year's elections underscore the dynamic yearning of Iran's masses for liberal reform, economic recovery, and constructive relations with the outside world.
The court summons could be a taste of things to come for the outgoing leader who, after receiving the backing of Ayatollah
What the huge disqualifications do tells us is that the Supreme Leader and his hardline establishment are flexing their muscles for anyone who's looking for trouble at this year's presidential election.
Until recently, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad behaved like a boxer who always knew that in fights against his rivals
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad on Monday defended his country's controversial nuclear programme while on a tour of
Dr. Trita Parsi joins Ahmed to discuss why sanctions are failing in Iran.
Dr. Trita Parsi and Professor Flynt Leverett join Ahmed to discuss the possibility that sanctions are actually helping the Iranian government.
One morning in September 2006, during the United Nations General Assembly, President George W. Bush’s daily intelligence
I admire a great deal of what Chávez and his Bolivarian Revolution accomplished in Venezuela. It's precisely because of these positive accomplishments that Chávez's record on the Middle East and North Africa is so disconcerting.
After three decades of frosty relations, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad made a historic visit to Cairo on February 5, 2012, making him the only post-revolutionary Iranian leader to set foot in the Arab heartland.
Last month, Dastjerdi said only a quarter of the $2.4 billion earmarked for medicine imports had been provided in the current
I expected -- what? Maybe for Ahmadinejad to say something shocking. Maybe to be deeply offended. Maybe to be very, very uncomfortable. Maybe to be lied to, very obviously, and very often.
Ahmadinejad, whose own second and final term in office ends next year, said authority should be used as a sacred gift, "not
Yom Kippur is a day of fasting, introspection and repentance. According to our faith, it is the last day of the year for
When the trumped-up passions of "Innocence of Muslims" cool, burnt-out buildings will be repaired, diplomatic dances will reboot. But who will stand up for the freedom to disbelieve, to criticize and to mock?
Ahmadinejad on the Holocaust: "I pass no judgement on historic events"