aid-in-dying

Twenty years ago, no one in the United States could claim a right to "physician aid in dying" (also called "physician-assisted suicide"). Today, more than 52 million Americans can.
The End of Life Option Act goes into effect in California on June 9, 2016, joining a handful of other states with similar legislation. The law empowers a terminally ill adult to request and receive a drug to hasten death.
I have lived with the reality of a premature death for more than four years. Today, I live with blackouts, blindness, convulsions and more. Aside from these horrific symptoms, I live in constant fear of even worse days that lie ahead. What crime did I commit to be forced to die this way?
People usually seek aid in dying because we have not provided aid in living. And if we believe the Supreme Court's insistence on choice, before offering an easy death we need first to assure the support is there for a life with dignity despite restrictions.
The bill, inspired by Brittany Maynard, passed in the state Senate Friday.
Democrats have vowed to make the bill inspired by Brittany Maynard a priority.
Had it passed, California would have joined Oregon, Washington and Vermont as one of the few states with such right-to-die
I have been haunted by a deathbed promise I made 24 years ago. But now with the Aid in Dying movement growing, it's time to break my silence and lend a voice to help terminally ill people control their end of life.
The California Medical Association, which represents more than 40,000 physicians in the Golden State, removed language from
In a video for Compassion & Choices that was recorded in March, she said the reason she became a lawyer was because she loves
Give us a break. In response to a question from the audience, Gawande agreed that "a patient with unbearable suffering should
This is the way my mother died -- by choice, after much research that we did together, in a nursing home that both permitted and facilitated the process and after 13 days with little demonstrable suffering.
Our first year of marriage was not the honeymoon Harlan and I envisioned. At a time when I should have been writing him sweet love notes, instead I wrote him into my health care directive.
Death-and-dying usually goes with I-don't-want-to-talk about-it. Katy Butler wants us to talk about it. She worries, though, about the culture of death-denial, and about the lack of language when we do try to talk.
New York state is 18 years behind in offering terminally ill patients the legal right -- and comfort -- to make autonomous decisions about how to die when suffering intolerably from terminal disease.
Death with dignity is an issue with consistent majority support that somehow endures being described as "controversial." But a vocal minority has been given a disproportionately outsized platform.
Last Wednesday, March 20, the Connecticut Assembly's Public Health Committee began its consideration of a bill modeled after Oregon's Death with Dignity Act. My heart swelled as I sat with them and heard the witness of these decent, altruistic, dedicated people.
Choices mean freedom. Freedom from all that may be worse than being "buried in my grave."