Aiyana Stanley-Jones

A few months ago, most probably would have believed that Gaines' best course of action was to comply with the police in order to get herself and her children home safely. But "a few months ago" was before Alton Sterling and Philando Castile.
May 16, 2016 marks the tragic death of a little black girl named Aiyana Stanley Jones. Six years ago Aiyana, 7, was killed while she slept at her grandmother's house. Joseph Weekley, the Detroit Police Officer who fatally shot her during a botched raid, is still on the force.
A group brings the Black Lives Matter movement to Hollywood Blvd.
Aside from the similarities in the sheer volume of blacks killed by police and those lynched decades before, there remain other staggering parallels between police killings and lynchings.
McGinty and his grand jury have blood on their hands. And while the U.S. masquerades as an exceptionalist beacon of democracy, the community is calling for Attorney General Loretta Lynch to investigate the grand jury process and immediately fire Timothy Loehmann, the officer who murdered Tamir.
Sandra Bland's family has filed a wrongful death suit, but the Department of Justice should conduct an independent investigation into Bland's death and an independent prosecutor should handle the case
"I guess no one hears the howling of a black girl ghost in the nighttime."
It is terrifying to consider that it takes the body of a black woman hanging dead in a jail cell -- over a traffic violation no less -- to finally get national attention on the issue of racist, police brutality against us.
On the eve of the 150th anniversary of Juneteenth, the day commemorated for having the last enslaved Blacks freed in America, it's time we seriously address the vitriolic legacies of white supremacy.
You won't be here for years and years, if ever at all. But I wanted you to have this, to know that you are not alone, and that you have an obligation to the black women who have been silenced to continue their work.
This Mother's Day feels different. Ominous somehow and heavy with sorrow. It seems wrong to celebrate when so many mothers are in pain. Whether weeping over the unarmed, and largely ignored, corpses of their daughters slain by police.
No one can deny black men's vulnerability in this society and the recent killings of Walter Scott and Eric Harris are painful reminders, but the fact is black women suffer the same injustices. Silence in mainstream and black America is the only reason why it isn't widely acknowledged.
On election night in 2008, I would have been stunned to learn that black people would continue to be killed in broad daylight under Obama's presidency. And my tears would take on new meaning had I seen a future in which a black president mostly says nothing as black citizens are routinely targeted for mass incarceration and killed by police.
The botched raid drew additional scrutiny to the Detroit Police Department, because it was filmed for a reality television
In view of these difficult realties, we want to use Black History Month as a time to remember all struggles for black and Latino civil rights, so it serves as a moment not only to reflect but also to mobilize by demanding justice for Jessica, Aiyana and Orta and all black and Latino lives.
Conyers went on to add that the tragedy should lead toward “cultivating community-focused, smart policing," starting with
"Today we personally informed the family of Aiyana Stanley–Jones that we have made a decision that we would not be going
For many of us, 2014 was an emotionally devastating year because of the seemingly continuous news stories of unarmed citizens falling victim to lethal police brutality. Many of us protested in 2014 and yet have not yet seen the change that wanted. So what are we going to do about it?