Al Smith

From FDR to Barack Obama to Bernie Sanders, conservatives are reading from the same playbook.
There is precedent for former presidential nominees seeking office again, though not in a different state from the one they cut their political teeth in.
The middle class that bolstered his campaign can expect a very unpleasant surprise.
At age 56, I get to be a rock star. In an athletic setting. Surrounded by some of the fittest and most motivated people I have ever met. All I have to do is keep showing up and let them watch me go at CrossFit with complete abandon. I have a new set of friends and admirers.
The 2016 Presidential election might go down in history as the year of the party-switchers. Republican Rick Perry was once a member of the Texas Democratic State Legislature. Potential Democratic Presidential candidate Jim Webb was once a Republican.
It could have been a wild angel that connected me to Dr. Jim Roach, M.D., but that angel came in the form of a (then) 82-year-old journalist named Al Smith.
It took a journalist with Mark Hebert's talents, and courage, to dig out a scandal about a sitting Governor and make it a national story. With a long-term national impact.
Even after the fire, the city's businesses continued to insist they could regulate themselves, but the deaths clearly demonstrated that companies like Triangle, if left to their own devices, would not concern themselves with their workers' safety.
My last piece began with the words, "Never let it be said that the rich are silent." That was too modest. Let's add that they're tone deaf too.
Throughout American history, political family dynasties have not been uncommon. However, these families have not always acted in unison. In fact, in some cases American political families have been split asunder by divergent political loyalties.