Albert Camus

Kyle Dargan What sorts of books am I talking about? Novels like Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser or The Rise of Silas Lapham
How can the light of your future be brightened? For Camus, the plague comes and goes but can never be completely eliminated
Author and artist Jacques Ferrandez talks about Algeria and the controversial first sentence of "The Stranger."
Camus's broad appeal can be attributed to his elevation of ethics over politics, and individual decision-making over collective ideologies. By searching for meaning in the face of life's absurdity, his essays and novels provide a moral framework that can be applied to everyday situations.
Seattle-based singer songwriter David Nyro shares his first single “What Happened To Us All,” one of several he’ll be debuting
Citing Marx's line that "religion is the opium of the people," the French philosopher Raymond Aron wrote a critique of Marxism entitled The Opium of the Intellectuals.
In just two words of five syllables, medieval man brewed a bitter antidote to all from melancholy and regret to hubris and ostentation: memento mori.
At the glamorous waterside student union on the campus of the University of Wisconsin, 50 feet from where he first played with Steve Miller and Boz Scaggs back in the '60s, Madison-based jazz artist Ben Sidran gazed out at the summer crowds exuding satisfaction and serenity. No regrets.
It's clear that we're living in an era where politics has failed and, like politicians, has become remote from the ordinary European citizen.
Whether it's literature or some other key that opens the door, it's important that school communities explicitly reflect on our readiness to offer these children, and all children, the opportunities for moral development and moral leadership that our nation needs.
When Johnny Depp raises a wry eyebrow on screen, it's an "existential performance." When Donald Rumsfeld spoke of "unknown unknowns," it was existential poetry. Though many politicians and entertainers welcome the label, now applied so loosely, Camus certainly did not.
Jérôme Garcin has completed his heroic trilogy. Twenty years ago he gave us Pour Jean Prévost. In 2013, Bleus horizons resurrected poet Jean de La Ville de Mirmont, who was killed at age 28 during the first months of the First World War.
Nobody of any age should be held in jail without a trial for three years. No child or adolescent should be held in an adult jail. Yet, a 16-year-old accused of stealing a backpack was kept in one of the most violent adult jails in the United States, Rikers Island in New York City, for three years without a trial. This was morally scandalous and inhumane. Even worse, he spent more than two years of that time in solitary confinement, locked up alone except to go to the shower, the recreation area, the visit room or the medical clinic. This was torture. The suicide of 22-year-old Kalief Browder on June 6, barely two years after his release and return home, was the final horror in his tragic and brutal journey into the depths of the adult criminal justice system in New York.
Ben, Blue Camus is your thirty-first album. From your perspective, what did you achieve on this album that you didn't on the previous thirty?
As many around the world said to Americans in September 2001, we say to the men and women throughout Paris, France and Europe today: You are not alone. Our unity will ultimately triumph, and our cause will ultimately prevail.
The proximate occasion for my publishing this short appreciation is, of course, the terrorist murder of a dozen staff of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7. But Camus speaks to us far beyond France, and beyond any particular event.
Moral and intellectual clarity about the world we live in are not compatible with self-exculpating glibness. Our adversaries' wrongness does not mean we are in the right. The substance of the terrorists' victory lies exactly in their success in having persuaded Western societies to empower our own authoritarian regimes.
This is not the first time that Manuel Valls has proposed changing the name of the French Socialist Party. That he has returned to the subject from the vantage point of his present position -- which is, like it or not, the head of the majority -- obviously gives his suggestion new weight.