Kyrie Irving The name of the NBA basketball star is a unisex Greek name used in the church refrain Kyrie Eleison. Thanks
Guests included Elaine May, Jeanne Berlin, Barry Diller, Mandy Patinkin, Lee Grant, Robert Benton, Barry Levinson, James
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Although a great deal of attention has been focused on Channing Tatum's hilarious
The Coens' latest film Hail, Caesar! has the brothers returning to some of their favorite territory: kidnappings, old Hollywood, and the screwball comedy. And, as usual, it's a Coen brothers film through and through.
Often, when we envision a damsel in distress we imagine characters like the protagonist of the 1914 silent film serial entitled The Perils of Pauline, Lois Lane hoping to be rescued by Superman, or the beefy Belle Rosen demonstrating her swimming technique in 1972's The Poseidon Adventure.
Park Chan-Wook's Stoker is a delicious hybrid of its influences, which mix into an engaging fable of its own.
Chan-wook Park's Stoker is audaciously, in-your-face creepy and exhilarating in a way few films have been since David Lynch's Blue Velvet. Because it's not just the creepiness -- but the way Park gets you involved in his world so that you can't look away.
The writer and director here is Richard LaGravenese, raising the question: Can the man who was an Oscar nominee for The Fisher King and has garnered praise for his screenplays for A Little Princess and Beloved, among others, bring a similar intelligence to a teen-oriented romance?
Beautiful Creatures is wonderfully wrought, funny, smart and enchanting, the best film I've seen thus far this year. Indeed, it's a tale of young love set in a milieu torn between the status quo and the supernatural.
So much of Beautiful Creatures is so unexpectedly terrific that it's almost a tragedy when the picture eventually falls victim to its own plot.
Based on the first in a series of books by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl, Beautiful Creatures (opening Thursday) hopes the "Twihards" can shift their focus from the undead to the magically endowed.
Theatrical form may be up against an impossible adversary in film, but it can be awfully heroic when a director doesn't seem to care.