Aldous Huxley

If you’re looking for a baby boy name that’s not all-the-rage right now, Nameberry has some suggestions with a vintage flair
And that's what the series showed in Season One so brilliantly in each occupied part of America. It wasn't just that Japanese
If you think I'm being melodramatic read what Trump surrogate, Scottie Nell Hughes, a television commentator, recently stated
Western civilization's paradigm - buttressed by capitalism, science, and religion - does not provide tools to transcend or
Sanders is the only candidate who represents the section of society that has had enough of being lied to, that has had enough of being hoodwinked by successive administrations that have promised much but done nothing but make life harder for the common man and woman.
If you need proof of how the modern welfare state can miss the mark, just look at the rising level of social inequality in much of the developed world.
Aldous Huxley was fascinated with elites. In his novel Brave New World (1931) he creates a society of Alphas ruling over Betas, Deltas, Gammas and Epsilons in a caste system state order. The rules of society are simple.
Before we get into how and whether this could actually happen, let's take a quick look at the study. And in the third study
Christopher Isherwood (1904-86) was an Anglo-American writer whose novels, memoirs, plays, and diaries span the 20th century, from his modernist beginnings in the late 1920s to his pathbreaking memoirs of the 1970s.
Michelle has written well and honestly about Indra and the cast of characters who make up the Yogas in the East and the West. She describes how Indra could be variously charming, sympathetic and warm, but also ambitious and ruthless.
"I was so honored to be included in that Buzzfeed list as there were some amazing books in that group. I hope readers will be intrigued by the premise: what if everyone in the world lost their hair?"
Hats off to Bob Morris for his ruthlessly whitebread, antiseptic article in the Sunday Styles section of the New York Times! Glamorizing ayahuasca with celebrity quotes and citing the LA Weekly in calling it "exceedingly trendy" is irresponsible on so many levels!
Many science fiction writers have rather accurately predicted future technologies, including the rise of the Internet and the demise of quality television. In doing so, they have given us language and ideas that have shaped the digital age in which we live.
Will technology and science that make our species more transhuman be used to create a deeper divide in society for the haves and have-nots?
There is something about owning a physical book, holding it in your hands, feeling the paper in between your fingerers while turning the pages and experiencing the journey of a tale on real paper, not on a paper white screen or illuminated retina display.
When we, in our helplessness as observers, try to fill up the void that inevitably follows loss -- that is when we forget that sometimes meaning is exactly what we feel: blue.