Alex Garland

In the sci-fi film “Annihilation,” Natalie Portman and Jennifer Jason Leigh play an ex-military biologist and a government
The intelligently written and beautifully acted play Marjorie Prime by Jordan Harrison -- now on extended run at Playwrights Horizons in New York through January 24 -- is also very timely in the world of today's technology.
There are many reasons to be impressed with Ex Machina, the recently released, exceptionally well-done sci-fi thriller directed by Alex Garland, starring Oscar Isaac, Domhnall Gleeson and Alicia Vikander. Most notably, however, is its ability to be both ordinary and unique at the same time.
If you think of a night at the movies as a chance for escapist fantasy, then you may want to think twice before screening Alex Garland's Ex Machina.
Caleb is a lucky guy. As the movie Ex Machina begins, he's just won the contest conducted by his employer Bluebook, the world's largest search engine. The prize is for him to spend a week at the super-secretive mountain retreat of his company's brilliant, prickly CEO.
What makes a mind come alive? And how will you know when it's happened? Two new films -- one about the death of the factory school, the other about the dawn of artificial intelligence -- attempt to answer this question from radically different vantage points.
Ex Machina is both tastily minimal and frustratingly simplistic. Alex Garland's directing debut (he wrote 28 Days Later and Sunshine) is, in essence, a three-hander about three people in a house. OK, a high-tech mansion, but you get the point. 
Gender is a crucial component of the Turing Test. Last summer, when a program named “Eugene Goostman” “passed” the test, it
There are so many questions we don't seem to be asking right now about the arrival of these potentially intelligent machines. And that is the genius of Alex Garland's film Ex Machina, a must-see that is one of the best, smartest, and most elegant films about artificial intelligence ever made.
Alex Garland's haunting and thought-provoking science-fiction film Ex Machina hits theaters today, and it excels at the kind of "small scale, big ideas" cinema that we get far too little of these days.
Told by The Huffington Post that it was actually blue and black, Garland laughed. The fact two people heard two completely
As the excitement for the upcoming release of the film adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson's "The Rum Diary" builds, here at
Director Mark Romanek's daunting task was to pluck three incipient possibles from real life; to look past a flair for performance