Alex Haley

Marian Wright Edelman believes if you don’t like the way the world is, you change it.
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The man elected as president in December, Adama Barrow, returned home on Thursday from exile in Senegal to cheering crowds.
In the past year, we have seen a welcome surge, prodded by new books on slavery, campus debates, and student protests, of new commitments by some universities and other institutions to confront the truth about their own histories, especially the ugly legacies of slavery and Native American genocide.
Watching the new Roots, which would be one of the best TV things you could do this week, you're reminded that in at least one important sense, it's about a bigger matter than even slavery.
Night after night the audience is offered the tale of Kinte's children and grandchildren as they live under the oppression
Could a person named Kunta Kinte have lived in Juffure, a town on the Gambia River, and been enslaved and carried to Annapolis, Maryland, on the Lord Ligonier in 1767? It didn't take much research to answer each of those questions with a resounding "Yes!"
The Rev. Jesse Jackson agreed and praised McGuire's leadership of the party, but he has said in the past that the Iowa Democratic
Whether assisting with care, finances or fun -- grandparents, grand-aunts and uncles and grandfriends are stepping up to make sure the children in their lives succeed.
Actress Alfre Woodard's grandfather died when her father was only a toddler, so this part of her family tree is a mystery. To uncover the past, Ms. Woodard goes an ancestral journey through Georgia and Louisiana.
I believe Ambassador Haley's place in American history should be more prominent. For a man who made American history six times, Ambassador Haley never spoke of his accomplishments or the past preferring to concentrate on the future.
“Roots,” one of the biggest events in television history, is coming back to the small screen.
Welcome to the Monkey House was first published by Playboy Magazine. Playboy's published countless controversial stories by likewise provocative authors. In spite of this literary contribution, or perhaps because of it, the pinup publication has faced censorship around the world.
From the covers of Ebony magazine to the Broadway stage, Cicely Tyson has had an illustrious career. Though she has played
Mother Nature, the power of a nascent storytelling art form in the televised mini-series, and a nation largely ignorant of and reluctant to come to terms with the horrors of its slave-owning past conspired to create a 'perfect storm' of enlightenment in America.
Genetic genealogy has been around for more than a dozen years, but has exploded in popularity over the last few. We're remarkably
I was about 10-years-old when I tried to read Alex Haley's Pulitzer Prize winning book, Roots.
"This career has been so wonderful to me. I've gotten to meet people. I've gotten to travel all over the world. I'm doing what I love to do, and I've been managing to do it since I was 9 years old."
As the genealogist who initially researched the first lady's family tree (four to five generations on all branches), I wanted to love American Tapestry: The Story of the Black, White and Multicultural Ancestors of Michelle Obama, but found myself disappointed -- mostly due to what's missing.
Admiring the television series Roots as a boy, Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. explores a passion for genetics and genealogies in a new PBS series, Finding Your Roots, to start this Sunday.