Alex salmond

Something we in Scotland learned the hard way in 2014 is that referendum questions are dangerous because they make both choices on the ballot paper seem equally plausible. By giving the people a choice we somehow assume that either option is a safe one.
Despite numerous economic and diplomatic concerns surrounding a Brexit, immigration has ignited the most conversation ahead of the historic vote.
The sun was shining, for the first time in six years, on the Hay Festival's final weekend, and Wales was spectacularly beautiful.
"On the one hand he can make claim to the title of 'the man who saved the union'. On the other, he'll now have to deliver
Polling stations have opened across Scotland today in a referendum that will decide whether the country leaves its 307-year
For those of us who consider British-ness and Scottish-ness to be important elements of who we are as individuals, there is a horrible sense of foreboding about the current debate and the likely consequences of separation.
England, conversely, is far more likely to vote for the Conservative Party, which is currently in power. So despite voting
John Swinney, the Finance Secretary for Scotland has repeated the SNP government's threat to walk away from Scotland's share of the UK debt.
While the movie Braveheart elicits eye rolls in Scotland for its inaccuracies (and marvel at its impact on tourism), William Wallace and Robert the Bruce, two key characters, are central figures in Scottish history.
Fast-forward to 2014. There is a contradiction and an absurdity at the heart of the SNP's economic claims regarding a currency union and, ultimately, the party's case for independence.