Alexis de Tocqueville

A central and ongoing challenge for our students is how to protect and strengthen democratic ways of life in a society where
De Tocqueville's writing shows that the positive treatment of women, considering them equals, is more than just "being nice
There is still a lot Americans can do to topple the police state tyrants, but any revolution that has any hope of succeeding needs to be prepared to reform the system from the bottom up. And that will mean re-learning step by painful step what it actually means to be a government of the people, by the people and for the people.
In what The New York Times cited as "the worst voter turnout in 72 years," the 2014-midterm elections were an opus dedicated
There is a recurring theme throughout the 2016 presidential campaign, particularly on the Republican side: "Be afraid -- be very afraid." It is enough to conclude American greatness lies in our historical rearview mirror. It is somewhat counterintuitive if one also accepts the myth of "American exceptionalism."
What much research proposes, and history also teaches, is that democracy flourishes when we start with the idea that all people are created equal, and endowed with certain inalienable rights.
Conversation in the United States about religion and politics these days is less civilized, more contemptuous. This involves more than the Republican Party's survival in a diverse world. We're turning on neighbors who have been part of the fabric of our society for decades.
Wealth is something we all have: if not monetary riches, we have our time, our love of family, our dedication to our great nation, and many ways that we can share joy and be generous with our efforts, because generosity enhances our humanity.
If we agree that the coming election might be the one shaping the nation's future, maybe instead of the candidates being questioned, regular Americans should be. Maybe every American should be asked: What is the United States to you?