Alice Paul

I marched for my right to sign a deed to a house or a contract on a car, using my own name
In the end, Representative King is consistent. Preemptively striking women like Tubman, Eleanor Roosevelt, Sojourner Truth, and Alice Paul from new currency fits a pattern of uninformed leadership regarding women's lives, their contributions to our nation, and a woman's place in our society.
As a member of the Advisory Committee for Women on 20s, I was delighted to hear the announcement that Harriet Tubman will be the face of the $20 bill.
Kudos to the Treasury Department which has announced that Harriet Tubman's face will grace the front of the redesigned $20 bill, making her the first woman in more than a century and first African American ever to be represented on the face of an American paper note.
Journalist and author Cokie Roberts says that philandering liar Alexander Hamilton is still making women wait their turn to assume their rightful place on the front of American currency.
As we celebrate today's monument designation, we remain hopeful for more "deeds" that recognize the contribution of women and move them towards full equality and participation in society.
I had decided not to vote in the presidential election. Even though I previously had performed my loyal and patriotic duty since 1972, this year was different. The charade and parade of fools running for president made me question the need to vote. How do I select the least horrible candidate?
Ninety-five years ago, after tireless work by generations of advocates, the 19th Amendment, finally, became the law of the land guaranteeing the right to vote for women. One hundred years ago, the success of the 19th Amendment did not seem so inevitable.
If people see their ancestral experience integrated -- not just mentioned in a checklist kind of way, but fully integrated into the larger narrative -- then they are far more likely to see that larger narrative of American history as something that speaks to them.
Although none of these 20 women were elected to office, they all had a great influence on public opinion and public policy. The reformers profiled below exercised influence not only because of the number of people they mobilized, but also because of the moral force of their ideas.