alice walker

The New York Times is standing by its decision to publish Alice Walker's recommendation of an author known for conspiracy-mongering.
Students should learn how these women were at the forefront of movements for liberation and resistance.
"So often, our own fear of failure is the thing that keeps us back."
Assessing our entrenched tendency to deprive women of efficacy.
With a House vote this week, a diverse group -- including Mark Ruffalo, Alice Walker, Laurence Tribe and FreedomWorks -- is getting involved.
When enduring tragedy, it is important to lean upon the practices that bring you joy and keep you focused.
She spoke to BUST Magazine about the importance of intersectional feminism.
Just because we are mothers doesn't mean we've left our brains, or our feminism, at the delivery room door. This Mother's Day, feminist moms like me who also are women of faith would appreciate any of these books. They reassure us that we are not alone in our struggles trying to practice our faith, whatever it may be, in the face of entrenched patriarchy.
First, let me begin by saying that the last thing that I have time for is to write about and analyze a Beyonce piece, as I am in the middle of finishing a book about health disparities and social injustice, which are issues that are deeply plaguing our community.
What better way to learn black history than through Walker's wisdom.
In one of the more notable turnarounds in recent Broadway history, The Color Purple -- which many viewers found self-deflated and uninvolving when it premiered in 2005 -- reveals itself upon its return (via London) as a stunning, exhilarating and altogether joyful theatrical experience.
In a country that is more divisive than ever, a show about the triumph of the indomitable human spirit and an unshakable faith in the goodness of God and ultimately, of man, was a much needed balm for this world-weary soul.
Later on in her life, Walker realized that she "had to show what happened to them and why they were like that," she said of her grandparents. She had to tell the story of how people could move forward, break free from their former selves and change for the better.
Desreta Jackson is best known for playing the young version of Celie Johnson, opposite Danny Glover, Whoopi Goldberg, and