While a drama major at the famed LaGuardia Arts High School, she began working professionally, like acting in the musical
For years and years, I labored under the assumption that comic books were only read by nerdy guys with a childish penchant for superheroes. But after seeing Marjane Satrapi's harrowing and exuberant film, Persepolis, I was shocked to find that it was adapted from a graphic memoir.
We black girls have our magic, but we need the words of Audre Lorde now more than ever. And in these messy times, so does everyone else.
Like African Americans, women, immigrants and religious minorities before us, LGBT people have faced a backlash ever since we first stood up for ourselves. Organizations come and go, and the focus of our efforts changes; but the work of democracy continues.
In more ways than one this is a very important musical for women, for feminism and for lesbians. This inspiring, nuanced and most importantly, autobiographical work helps to prove the legitimacy and skill of women in Broadway as well as spread awareness about lesbian experiences and narratives.
A group of freshmen at Duke University is boycotting a critically acclaimed book assigned for summer reading because of its gay-themed content. The book in question is Alison Bechdel's illustrated memoir Fun Home--which has recently been made into a Tony Award-winning musical. The memoir follows Bechdel's relationship with her closeted gay father, who committed suicide after the then-19-year-old author came out to her parents as a lesbian. It's a tough story to read, no doubt, but it's a reality that many LGBT people face.
No matter how far a Southern man goes, he can't outrun Scripture. After a decade as an open atheist and nearly half as long as an openly gay man, the Word still imperceptibly slips from my lips at the odd moment or two.
New York Times best-seller could "compromise" their beliefs. Huh?
The Tony Award-winning musical, Fun Home, begins and ends with a child, Alison, demanding that her father play "airplane" with her. In between those bookending moments we see Alison grow up, come out as a lesbian, and take flight as a lover, while her father sinks into the closet as a gay man.
Another contributor to the collection, Jen Aprahamian, penned a story titled, "Read 1:19 AM," which addresses the anxieties
Bernie is a great guy, but he is no Steph Curry, and he is no Alison Bechdel. His value, not to be underestimated, is in pressuring the frontrunner by energizing progressives.