all saints' day

Religious education, theology, degrees, and reflections from the highest religious order are central. But so are the vastly different challenges before us that are gifts to us from those living right around us!
El Día de los Muertos, the Mexican interpretation of Allhallowtide, celebrates and good-naturedly mocks death as a means of accepting and reducing fear of it.
All photographs by Fabiola Chesnut, a native of Morelia, Michoacan, and Head of the Department of Fine Arts at Huguenot High
On this day Catholics honor all those who have entered heaven.
It's considered a liminal time, when the veil between life and death grows thin.
The culture of Mexico is not alone in its remembrance of death, but it is unique in how, more often than not, these commemorations are more festive than somber.
This year, in our church's All Saints celebration, I lit a candle to my birth parents Ken and Sophia, to birth grandparents Clinton and Jessie, to Katie and John, my saints I'll never meet, but whose genes are the weft and warp in the tapestry that is me.
My house is appropriately decked with jack-o-lanterns in the window, a bowl of candy is on the counter ready for any goblins who stop by this evening and the "Happy Halloween" yard flag is flying off the porch.
The queer saints gather to break bread together, to keep Sabbath, to pray, to watch and witness, to hope, believing in the Beloved Community of unconditional grace that we have not yet seen in fullness -- only in a glass darkly in our queer koinonia. This is true love for God, without self-interest, with nothing left to gain.