Allen Toussaint

Don't cry for New Orleans. While it was a time to mourn the loss of a great talent, Prince, the New Orleans Jazz Fest was a confirmation and celebration of the reincarnation of the City many had written off as dead a decade earlier.
Which is only right. Dr. John and Allen Toussaint at Jazzfest 2015 Photo by Karen Beninato The rain never let up enough to
The other theme of the day was guitars, and plenty of them. Tedeschi Trucks Band with Jimmie Vaughan and Billy F. Gibbons
#7 Had a finger shot off protecting a bandmate whose mother told him she would "chop his cojones off if anything happened to her son." #8 So he switched from playing guitar to playing piano.
Allen Toussaint won me over long before I knew his name. If I live to be 200, for example, I won't forget holding my new black-and-gold Realistic transistor radio up to my ear back in eighth grade and hearing Ernie K-Doe's "Mother-in-Law."
Legendary musician, songwriter and producer Allen Toussaint passed away on November 9, 2015, at the age of 77. The New Orleans native was instrumental in creating and sustaining much of the music that has come out of the Crescent City since the late 1960s.
A member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Toussaint was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama in 2013.
Rescue workers were called to Toussaint's hotel early Tuesday morning and managed to revive him after he suffered a heart attack.
"That's My Momma!" James Andrews said of the Baby Doll dancing during his New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival set. His show was a family affair, with wife Karen Gant-Andrews belting out an "At Last" that would have done Etta James proud.
Weird Al has two releases coming up--a twenty-fifth anniversary edition of UHF and also The Compleat Al. Here he explains why there's the sudden Al-Fest.
"Jessie J is such a powerhouse as a performer," says Smokey. "She gave an amazing take on 'Cruisin' for Smokey & Friends, and it was an absolute pleasure to have her join me on stage to perform it live in Edinburgh.
"Music, absolutely, without question, put me in a direction that you can say saved my life, although to me, my life was already safe."
Seeing Allen Toussaint perform twice in the space of about 60 days -- in drastically different circumstances each time -- reminded me of why a love for musical roots can seemingly never run out of ways to discover and rediscover the beginnings of American popular music.
Jazz, rock, electronica, world music and everything in-between are more accessible than ever this year as Jazz Fest comes to high definition cable television on AXS TV.
This new ICON collection not only includes "Sun," but also some of your trademark songs like "Heaven Is A Place On Earth," which has become a bit of an anthem, plus hits such as "Circle In The Sand," "I Get Weak," and "Live Your Life Be Free."
This week our playlist includes music by Allen Toussaint, Philip Glass, Elvis Presley, Justin Timberlake, Stephen Stills, Sade, Max Roach and more.
5. Ceremony, Screaming Females At St. Stephens While it may be a little annoying to go to a church to see a show after the
It seemed inevitable, but we finally have New Orleans premier band celebrating Mardi Gras on a new record.
"Hugh Laurie: Let Them Talk - A Celebration of New Orleans Blues" is part heartfelt travelogue, part uncomfortable small club gig. Laurie's enthusiasm for all parts of Southern culture is matched by his charm in discussing it.
Hugh Laurie has a new album, Let Them Talk, which is New Orleans blues based. Here he discusses how he came up with that idea.