alone time

From donating blood to hiding in the spider-filled basement, these tactics highlight parents' desperation in the age of coronavirus.
Asking for some "me time" can actually benefit your relationship.
For starters, I'm fresh out of calories. We kick off our Seasonal Eating Marathon at Thanksgiving and don't take a break
It's easy to get caught up in your routine and chores every day, but don't let it consume 100% of your life. It can be pretty stressful at times, but if you take it one day at a time and try to roll with the punches, you may be able to avoid stress a little better.
Sometimes it becomes too much, and we need a break.
I can't remember the first book I ever read, and I can't remember the name of every book that has changed my life. I can, however, tell you every story I have read that has made a significant impact on my life. When I was growing up we didn't have Kindles and laptops and smartphones that had every book ever written at the touch of a button.
The fear of being alone is ingrained early on, basically as soon as you exit the womb. No one wants to be the person who doesn't know anyone at a party, even though if you look at it differently, it can actually be a fun experience.
When we are fully absorbed in an activity, the mind tends to get focused and more pointed. "Me" time away from business-at-hand allows the mind to become steadier, quieter, promoting more awareness, harnessing new energy, becoming more attentive.
Before my divorce, I never knew how much I hated having alone time. Just lying in bed at night alone in my apartment on nights that my ex-husband had the boys were so hard. I would either watch TV or read until I couldn't bear to keep my eyes open any longer.
I arrived the other night in the Twin Cities for a client meeting, and stayed in an ultra-swank hotel in downtown Minneapolis. The kind of place you walk into and, thanks to the genius lighting scheme, sculptural elements, music and overall vibe, you feel way cooler than you have any business being.