amanda palmer

The author's books were the spark of a movement in my evolution as an artist that took me away from shame and toward confession.
When you strip away everything else she has done -- author, TED speaker, and crowdfunding innovator -- one thing becomes
For the record, we both acknowledge Beyoncé's talent and appreciate why so many people, and women in particular, are applauding Lemonade, and perhaps seeing themselves in it. That's not our issue or focus. The impetus for this conversation was a post on Facebook discussing feminist scholar bell hooks' response to Beyoncé's visual album, Lemonade.
The above lyrics are just a sampling of Dooley's theatrical and idiosyncratic style, which naturally likens her to artists
Last night I sat with six thousand friends, many of them complete strangers, and celebrated the life and music of David Bowie. The event was the annual tribute concert series put on by the remarkable Michael Dorf of City Winery.
We're poised at an incredible moment in the world of art and commerce, because artists who have a robust fanbase actually do have a choice not to pimp themselves out for cars or shampoo. We're just taking baby steps so far into this new paradigm.
In 2010, Lady Gaga tweeted a photo of herself standing in front of the marquee at Madison Square Garden. Later that night, she explained how she would dream that one day her name would be in lights at the venue.
I'm halfway into my first Kickstarter campaign for my latest book, and it's kind of kicking my ass, but in that worthwhile, good-for-you-in-the-long-run, Mr. Miyagi-to-the-Karate Kid kind of way.
Part artist manifesto, part confessional, part feminist memoir: Amanda Palmer's The Art of Asking, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help is a thoughtful treatise on the spectrum of giving and receiving help from others, in whatever shape that may take.