Amartya Sen

It's beyond reasonable dispute that Saudi Arabia’s war and blockade in Yemen would not be possible without U.S. approval.
In this one world, it sometimes seems a race is on between the newly empowered and the recently dispossessed. The truth is not only that both realities exist simultaneously, but that one is a condition of the other.
Accompanying the growth debate is a plethora of discourse on the (lack of) relevance of national statistics, especially GDP
If you can picture the Beatles explaining today's economy through their songs' lyrics, I suggest you take a look at Federico Rampini's work.
Enriching the informational base of democracy and making greater use of interactive public reasoning can contribute significantly to making democracy more workable, and also allow reasoned assessment of social welfare.
In addition to fortifying women with more choices and freedoms in areas like education, healthcare and nutrition, I think that one of the most powerful ways to expedite "a better future for all" is to give women greater economic freedom and opportunities.
Three of the major factors in the basic oppression of women in the developing world are child labor, child marriage and gender-based violence. Getting girls into primary school and giving them the opportunity for secondary education are important tools for addressing these sources of vulnerability.
480504621 In the run up to the European parliamentary elections next month, anti-Europe populists, such as Marine Le Pen's National Front in France, have been fanning the nationalist flames by telling voters that two leading left-of center Nobel laureates in economics -- Amartya Sen and Joe Stiglitz -- oppose a more united Europe.
Rather than chucking the baby with the bath water, India can both keep the baby and get rid of the bath water. As B.R. Ambedkar
You worked hard for that money. No one can deny that. You have been rewarded for your talent, your intelligence, your risk-taking, your creativity, and your good fortune. The notion that you should change a system that has worked so well must seem downright stupid.
When Indian economist Amartya Sen was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1998, he chose lines from a poem by the beloved Rabindranath Tagore to open his dinner speech. Christie's caught up with Sen, who shared his thoughts about Tagore and painter Nandalal Bose's legacies.
Today, millions of people face extreme insecurity as a result of conflicts and economic crises -- not only in acute conflicts like Syria but also in many lower-profile crises.
This is the second year in a row that the ten countries with the lowest Human Development Index are located in Sub-Saharan
Poverty kills. Addressing the underlying social and economic conditions that breed poverty and ill health -- in other words, better policy, not better medicine -- is the solution.
Interfaith children, natural experts in this field, have not been officially welcomed, whether in high-level interfaith dialogue between religious institutions or in more local grassroots interfaith activism.
It's no surprise that GDP is no longer the first place economists, policymakers, and individuals go to answer the question "how are people really doing?"
Wouldn't it be great if an objective, fact-based tool existed to identify the most strategic levers for change -- to help keep California from losing its edge? Such a tool now exists.
Jin's sudden poverty changed the course of her life. When she was eight, she moved to the U.S. and met a remarkable woman
In 1999, the government launched Healthy People 2010, an ambitious project to narrow the disparities in health outcomes for different groups. But it failed. Now that health care reform has passed, it's time for Healthy People 2020.
I thank him for an hour's discursive gab with "an old fashioned Indian wiseman." The villages are not gone, but the tragedy