American Conservatory Theater

A musical version of the wild, queer-inclusive classic will benefit LGBTQ youth.
The play carries them from the decade before the Soviet invasion of 1979, through the civil war that followed the Soviets
That's a wordy way of getting to my feeling that Bartlett's text -- a vision of Great Britain's royal family and the British
Most of the 90 minutes is spent in monologues that struggle with illusions, delusions and uncomfortable realities that bring
Mary Swanson (Cary Cronholm Rose), a young woman who recently moved to Middletown and is eager to make new friends. Because
The play's creators want to "expand the definition of Americana," explains Hurt, enfolding jazz, hip-hop, and spoken word with the roots music of folk, gospel, ragtime, and blues in an innovative, highly entertaining way.
Words don't come easily to the four personalities who populate Will Eno's The Realistic Joneses. And when they do come, very often those words communicate the failure of communication itself.
For the past few months, Chris King's 12-minute film entitled Birthday has been appearing in shorts programs around the film
In the following fascinating episode of Theatre Talk, playwright Terry Teachout and actor John Douglas Thompson discuss Armstrong's
John Douglas Thompson as Louis Armstrong in Satchmo at the Waldorf is such a delight. Directed by Gordon Edelstein, Thompson embodies the iconic trumpet player and singer in an engrossing, thought-provoking performance in the intermission-free play.
ACT's one-man play, "Satchmo at the Waldorf," is set, post-performance, in Louis Armstrong spacious dressing room at the ritzy Waldorf Astoria hotel. Why does it matter that the name of the hotel is in the title of the play? Was this a particularly memorable concert by Satchmo?
Anyone lucky enough to see Satchmo at the Waldorf, a one-actor, three-character show in ACT's Geary Theater, will discover a very different Louis Armstrong: a man who loved music above all else and suffered through poverty, incarceration, racism, gangland threats and ultimately, through declining health, to blow his horn in ways that few if any have equalled.
When American Conservatory Theater first announced plans to renovate the Strand Theatre on Market Street, its Artistic Director, Carey Perloff, was bubbling over with ideas about what a second performance space could do for the company.
Directed by Jenny Sullivan on a simple and attractive unit set designed by Nina Ball, Center Rep's production benefits immensely from Scot Woolley's musical arrangements, Steve Blum's music direction and the musical supervision of Brandon Adams.
The past weighs heavily on Walter "Pops" Washington, the angry, suspicious ex-cop whose rage and stubbornness propel the fierce Between Riverside and Crazy, which opened American Conservatory Theater's 49th season a few days ago.
A decade later Furth and Sondheim teamed up once more for Merrily We Roll Along, which focused on the changing dynamics between three friends over the course of their lives.
Last fall, as Mike Daisey was performing his new tetralogy entitled The Great Tragedies, he recounted some of his experiences as a student in London. One of his acting teachers was a fierce martinet with a habit of interrupting her students by yelling "YOU'RE BORING ME! "
Now people are going to say there was no need for Williamstown to make a comeback, because it never went anywhere, but let me lay out my case.
Mr. Burns is having a stellar run at American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco with Mark Rucker at the helm. In the play the survivors of a North American apocalypse barely salvage food or weapons but in abundance they salvage culture in the form of the Simpsons, and specifically the 1993 episode "Cape Fear."