american pharoah

The vice president shared the anecdote about American Pharoah during a Baltimore policy retreat, but not everyone's buying it.
In the year since winning the Triple Crown and 2015 Breeders' Cup Classic, American Pharoah has received international accolades.
Gary Stevens won the 1988 Kentucky Derby with the brilliant three-year-old filly, Winning Colors. Now he hopes to make racing history with another female, the splendid five-year-old mare, Beholder.
Good news: Ahmed Zayat, owner of American Pharoah, announced that his horse would not be retired and would finish the season at the Breeder's Cup running in the Classic.
It's a tough year to be a three year-old colt if your name isn't American Pharoah. The Haskell Invitational and Triple Crown winner's classmates have been chasing his famously scant tail across the finish line since his second start, and first win, last September when he trounced the field in the Del Mar Futurity.
The Triple Crown winner American Pharoah wins Haskell in return.
It might be hard to accept that someone's pet earns more money than you do -- but unless you're really rich, it's true. From internet sensations, to movie stars, to commercial actors, to print models, cats, dogs and animals of all stripes have raked in millions -- or even tens of millions -- for their owners.
Triple Crown winners, like Secretariat, Affirmed and Seattle Slew, are revered. This year is no different, the Millennials have taken American Pharoah as their own on his trip to win the Triple Crown.
Have we, as a nation, lost our bearings? Have we lost all sense of proportion? The jubilation and near-hysterical levels of enthusiasm in response to American Pharoah winning horse racing's Triple Crown were not only wretchedly excessive, they were nutty.
Horse racing represents the two things I hate most: animal abuse and rich white people celebrating. Nevertheless, congratulations to American Pharoah on winning the equestrian Triple Crown.